Hammond Field Day, awesome/ finalized program for the prairie-oriented LNPS conference, Feb 5-7, 2016

“Nature is an open book for those who care to read. Each grass-covered hillside is a page on which is written the history of the past, conditions of the present, and the predictions of the future.” – John Ernest Weaver

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above, below, my November 2001 planting in Pearl River County, Mississippi done with seed from the ancient Frey prairie relict, which used to be located five miles directly south of Eunice, Louisiana on an old discontinued rail bed. The seeding at the farm was an experiment that worked, these photos taken Tuesday. The old Frey prairie site, until recently, one of the most floriferous patches of ground in the state. The farmer, who for twenty five years let us dig prairie sod for restorations there, decided the prairie would be better upside down so he plowed it under for an addition to his adjacent rice field. Yikes.

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The beauty of the Frey planting at my farm is in all its subtlety.  What was once an over-grazed cow-field has transformed into a delightfully intricate reflection of Frey by simply adding seed, now, rare genetics.

…the joy of prairie lies in its subtlety. Suzanne Winckler (2004, Prairie: A North American Guide, University of Iowa Press

 

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above, a view of a field at the farm that was never seeded and only managed with prescribed fire, since 1997. Incredibly diverse vegetation has developed here over the last 18 years by just burning. click to enlarge the images..

LSU Horticultural Field Day – Hammond Station – Thursday was the bomb!

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Horticulturist Dr. Allen Owings, LSU, discusses the research-demonstration gardens with the nursery industry group at Hammond Thursday. Many of these gardens are now all-native, with plants grown by Dr. Yan Chen and her staff, from seed collected, provided to the station by yours truly, in 2013.

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There are many very long, eight feet wide garden beds clearly labeled and filled with hundreds of plants of Narrow Leafed Bluestem, Little Bluestem, Splitbeard Bluestem, Indian grass, Switch grass, Tridens grass, Love grass, and Side Oats Gramma grass. Dr. Yan is interested in the conservation value and overall functionality of the grasses. She spoke about their beauty and of their horticultural qualities. She spoke of their connection to “the sense of place”. There are also gardens of some of the better horticultural species of prairie and Pine herbaceous flowering plants , too.

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above, Dr. Yan Chen discusses the attributes of native prairie grasses. Behind Dr. Yan, you can see the bright red of the knockout Roses in the Natives and Popular Plant Care and Maintenance Gardens. These are gardens demonstrating native companion plants for the Red Knockout Rose and common annual Vinca.

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Little Bluestem grass is a knock-out.

Actually, the Little Blue is laying over here more than it would in a poor soil without irrigation. We talked about cutting these back just before bloom in order that they stay more erect. Prairie grasses are used to the worst soil and are adaptable to super-low moisture, and low nutrient soils

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Large yellow flowers of Hibiscus aculeatus, Pineland Hibiscus bloom after being cut back in the summer after their first flowers went to fruit.

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Dr. Yan has cut the flower heads of the Texas Coneflower, Rudbeckia nitida var. Texana, twice this year, at late April and June, harvesting lots of seed and creating a chance for the plants to re-bloom, which they have. So by manipulation, you can get three flushes of flowers. Normally they would bloom just once.

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above, the Care and Maintenance gardens in June, with Rudbeckia nidita at peak flower, Indian grass in glaucus foliage. (photos by Yan Chen)

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above, among other horticultural delights at the field day was this Celosia, a non-native, yes, but a great bee plant. There is value in pollinators that aren’t native. see the celosia-bee video below…

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Purely for horticulture’s sake, the very striking nine foot tall dark purple colored grass Black Stockings Fountain Grass, Pennisetum trispecific. Grasses are swell.

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coefficient of conservatism determines what species are endemic to a particular habitat and how each species is placed in terms of rarity in the habitat.

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with prairie landscapes, the extended period of flowering and the diversity-variation of species carries pollinators through the entire growing season.

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these two above pages are only two of a total of five pages of phenology for the Coastal Prairie of La., The Cajun Prairie.

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Indian grass seed from the Cajun Prairie was used to grow six inch plugs, for the extra-steep slope at Repentance Park, Baton Rouge. Horticultural uses of natives has great potential for industry expansion, enhancement. the Picture sent to my freind Joe James, with Reed-Hilderbrand Architects, who helped design the Park. Someone with City gov’t sent him the image with this note, “With a hectic week of development and activity downtown, I was walking by and just had to pause at Repentance Park. There is something wonderfully beautiful about the Indian Grass in the fall. Check it out!”

backing fires, black lines and head fires, oh, my!

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above, the burn plan before I burned with Kurt Kotteman of Kotteman Tree and Forestry Service Monday. He and his crew let me, el gringo, help. It was the largest burn I have been involved with. What an exciting fire it was. We started at ten and got done at about 6, a long day. I got to throw some head fire once we got the southern portion protected, blacked-in. Head fires are exhilarating in this scale and the ferocity, compared to backing fires, especially when you have Inkberry en mass is impressive. Large patches of the colonizing Inkberry Holly, Ilex glabra and Big Inkberry Holly, Ilex coreacea, grow along with fine fuel grasses in Pine prairie habitat. The leaves of both black-berried Gallberries contain a waxy coating that is highly flammable. With a head fire and some wind, these masses of shrubbery go up in red flaming leaps of twenty feet or higher. Leapin’ lizards!!!! the dotted line is a line Kurt used as a safe line, due to its high moisture and low, very little, fuel load.

this on-the-fly video shows the immediate result of laying down a continuous fifty foot line of flame in a Gallbery patch with with a five mph wind behind it, and seeing the immediate reaction. Its tough getting through the Gallberry patches especially when you have fire on your tail and you get wrapped up in a greenbriar (smilax)! Yeee-Ouch, already!!

Baygall, Hammock, Bay head, all synonymous.

:  red bay
2
:  a tract of swampy land; especially  :  a low-lying tract of boggy or spongy land in the southern U.S. usually overgrown with the inkberry and with bay trees
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Baygalls are cool. There are loaded with evergreen shrubs and trees. Ilex coreacea, foreground on left, is a beautiful plant. The only place I’ve ever seen it for sale was through Woodlanders, Aiken, SC. But it should be more available. Dark green waxy leaves, with plants that form colonies, tight thickets.
I once asked famous Texas natives landscape designer and nurseryman Will Fleming of Hempstead, Tx., why he like Ilex coreacea and he said “Because its pretty.”.
Wow. pretty good reason.
In the baygall along with coreacea, you’ll find Red Bay (Persea), Sweet Bay (Magnolia virginiana), Southern Magnolia, Ilex glabra, Lyonia lucida, Itea virginica, Smilax, Cepalanthus occidentalis, Pinus palustrus (Long Leaf Pine), Pinus taeda, Black Gum, Taxodium ascendens, sphagnum, chasmanthium, wax Myrtle, odorless wax Myrtle, Cinnamon fern, Mitchellia repens, with a cyrilla thrown in every now and then. In east Louisiana Baygalls, you might see the rare Clethra alnifolia. In the western-most Louisiana baygalls you may find the rare Rudbeckia scabrifolia, Rough Coneflower, which is nearly identical to La. Coastal Tallgrass prairie’s R. Nitida, but is specific only to baygalls.
The shaded Baygalls transition into pitcher plant bogs, which are open and sunny and grass dominant. Baygalls have very little vegetation on the ground. Soils are sandy and are generally wet with occasional seeps, springs that can be tiny or very substantial. Fires generally blow through the grassy pitcher plant bogs and stop dead at Baygalls, with fuel levels low, and moisture levels high.
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thickets of black-berried holly cover an area of a Baygall, in St Tammany Parish, Louisiana click to enlarge
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The adjacent, grassy, pitcher plant bog in the distance, shining in the sun.
Gaillardia aestivalis, butterfly magnet 
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speaking of high horticulture, on of the highlighted plants LSU is touting is the Mesa Gailardia. A good plant, I’m sure. This’n above, is a variant species, an east Texan, Gaillardia aestivalis var. winkleri, found in very small populations in ten counties including Newton, which is on the state line with Loosiana. hmmm. These are variations of the white, the normal color of this subspecies. These surely have some horticultural promise. and they are all exceptional butterfly/ nectar plants. The bestest!
Gailardia aestivalis is yellow centered and maroon wine petaled in Loosiana with some populations having the subspecies flavovirens, an all yellow.
Prairie Event – February 5-7th 2016, Alexandria area, Loosiana, for more info, check in with Louisiana Native Plant Society after the middle of this month, when this program in its entirety, will be posted. Whodat!

8:30-9:00 Dr. Charles Allen – Prairie Garden Dynamics – Natural Changes Through the Years

9:00-9:30 Larry Allain –  Prairie Conservation and the Fate of Native Pollinators

9:30-10:00 Jim Foret – How to Solve All of the World’s Problems Using Prairie

10:00-10:15 Break

10:15-10:45 Dr. Malcolm Vidrine –  The Cajun Prairie Gardens and the Cajun Prairie Restoration Project in Eunice – Flowering Phenology as it Relates to Natural Landscaping, Pollinators and Just Plain ‘Knock Your Eyes Out’ Beauty!

10:45-11:15 Beth Erwin – What I Have Learned About Hydrology and Prairies in Northeast Louisiana

11:15-11:45 Jessie Johnson – Briarwood’s Wildflower Meadow and How it Came into Being Because of Hungry Voles

11:45-12:30 Lunch

12:30-1:15 Business meeting (begins mid-way through lunch, in lunch room)

1:30-2:30 Jim Willis – Wildlife Habitat Federation – Bringing Back the B’s–Restoring Native Habitat in the Coastal Prairie

Larry Allain, Botanist, USGS National Wetlands Center, Lafayette, La

Charles Allen, Botanist, Fort Polk, Louisiana, Environmental, Colorado State University
Beth Erwin, Curator, Kalorama Nature Preserve, Collinston, La
Jim Foret, Horticulture, University of Louisiana, Lafayette
Jessie Johnson, Curator, Caroline Dorman Nature Preserve, Saline, La
Malcolm Vidrine, Biologist, Louisiana State University, Eunice
Jim Willis, Co-founder/ President, Wildlife Habitat Federation-Jim Willis Consultants, LLC, Cat Springs, Tx
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Crosby Arbo event/ February Prairie Gardening Conference in Louisiana

Crosby Arboretum, Mississippi State University event!

This Saturday July 11 is the day of the annual Aquatic plant sale (and gardening talks) at Crosby Arboretum, in Picayune, Mississippi. The Arbo has been doing this sale for many years and the staff works hard to propagate and find, cool plants to offer for sale for your water garden. I will be leading a field walk along the “pond journey” at 10:00, discussing the delights of having marginal aquatic plants in the garden and how to grow many of those we see from scratch.

Eileen Hollander, of the Greater New Orleans Iris Society will talk about propagation of the endemic, treasured Louisiana Iris at 11:00.

http://crosbyarboretum.msstate.edu/july-calendar

February Prairie Gardening-Restoration Conference in Louisiana

I was asked by Bud Willis, the president of the La. Native Plant Society to help put together an education program focused on prairie gardening and restoration. With the help of Charles Allen, Beth Irwin and Rick Webb, I have succeeded in doing that, I think.

We have put together a single day of prairie presentations by seven of the most knowledgeable folks I know. Mark your calendars, Feb 5-7th, 2016 in the Alexandria, La. area.

Beth Irwin will speak about her work with her prairie gardens at Kalorama Nature Preserve and with Rector Hopgood’s amazing prairie in Mer Rouge Louisiana.

Charles Allen will speak on prairie dynamics natural succession

Malcolm Vidrine will speak of his work with building prairie gardens and will touch on prairie ecology.

Tree hugger and dirt lover Jim Foret (University of La, Lafayette) will speak of his home prairie garden.

Jessie Johnson will speak of her prairie gardens at Caroline Dorman’s Briarwood Nature Preserve.

Larry Allain of the National Wetlands Center will speak on prairie restorations he’s worked with and maybe share some insights into his many years of study of prairie pollinators.

Jim Willis of Cat Spring, Texas , co-founder of the Wildlife Habitat Federation (WHF), is a prairie gunslinger like no other. He has helped re-establish over 40,000 acres of prairie by way of his wonderful work with the WHF. Jim is a master of the farm implement when it comes to building grasslands.

Bring your questions. You’ll most likely get them answered at the conf. See the article from the Houston Chronicle on Jim and the WHF, below. how lucky we are to have him visit with us from so far away.

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/science-environment/article/Prairie-landowners-replant-to-make-room-for-quail-5928426.php

It should be a great day with lots of information shared.

Cucumbers with Character

On to horticulture in the garden…..

I have been working like a Turk over the years, trying to bring in a cucumber crop on a steady basis through the summer. Around here, you can grow cukes from April to November and you should. I try to put in a new crop every couple of weeks or once a month at least. This insures a steady stream of them. I’m on my fifth crop right now. Just planted seed yesterday.

I can’t stand a store bought cucumber. They are pretty to look at but not so good to eat. yuk!

Grow your own. Its so darned easy.

Okay, sometimes things go horribly wrong but heck, that’s farmin’, folks.

Its when they go right that matters and if you do a crop each month, you’re gonna enjoy reaping the benefits of your work. Go organic, dude. Yee who tries sometimes succeeds.

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My planting yesterday of cukes. Last week I took a shovel and turned the soil in this spot. came back yesterday and turned again, opened a slight linear trench with my shovel head, and sowed seed. I stepped on the seed to press them into the ground, and then barely covered them by busting a few clumps of soil with my hands over the seed trench. Then I stepped on the trench again to double up on soil-seed contact.

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a garden planted June 15th with a row of squash in the back and two rows of cukes in the foreground, left. I built two simple structures out of scraps for the vines to climb onto.

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this is the same garden yesterday. I build leaning trellises so the cukes hang away from foliage and are easier to find.

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I love to mulch with cardboard. these were planted a couple of weeks ago, just tied up yesterday, onto the cross-rope with little strings. I use the same technique of stringing that I learned at the tomato farm where I worked when I was just a whippersnapper. Tie the string in a boland knot so it doesnt sinch down and strangle the stem and then go up to the cross-rope and tie off. Each week, I assist the vines up the string by wrapping the vine around the string, just like at my old friend Lee Smith’s farm! Cardboard is so cool to work with, and its like, free! You can see the old cardboard (behind, in white) from last year, still suppressing weeds. Working overtime!

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looking north, Monty the Labradorian prairie dog chillin’ next to the Cucurbitaceae patch. On the left going up my hog-panel dragon sculpture is the wild and crazy Cucuzza squash vine, just getting started. In the center of the image is my heirloom White Chayote vine, down here we call the Merletons (we say it Millitons). French, I guess. I got this from friend, Bonnie Bordelon. Thanks Bonnie!

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You can see in the foreground here, my mulch job with all the recycled paper I collected from our office last week. saweet!!!

Verbena-on-a-Stick, Verbena bonariensis, great plant for nectaring Lepidoptera

Most garden folks know the common weed Verbena Braziliensis. Its a weed you can find all over the Gulf Coast; not so pretty, but a Butterfly magnet. Most folks don’t know V. bonariensis, a bad-ass plant for garden color with a long, long bloom time and an ability like few, to attract so many kinds of Skippers and Butterflies, flies, wasps, bees and such. Real nice.

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I grew about 250 of these last year from seed. Spent ten bucks and ended up with lots of plugs, which I planted and gave away. I used to grow this years ago just for the flowering but I would say it is a solid 10 when it comes to pollinator attraction. It didn’t like it in the areas I burned but it loves to grow, most places that are sunny. Its not a stellar perennial but if you plant several they will hang on for some time; years. I found a stand of this plant with Charles Allen once in Newton County Texas at an old home site where the home was gone and the soil sandy and that is likely why it persisted so many years. Howabout dat.

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I know you have been waiting to see my life-size carboard cut-out Blue Hawaii Elvis so I placed him, for scale, in front of the Verbena bonariensis in the garden. Thank you ver’ much.

I posted a youtube vid with the Gulf Fritillary that was hangin’ out at the garden yesterday. There were lots of different Skipper Butterflies working the flowers.

 

 

up to our arses in grarsses/ Dr. Mac Alford, Crosby Arboretum Botany walk

While working on another notch in the black belt last week, I attended the way-cool Grasses, Sedges and Rushes class hosted by none other than the Master of grasses himself, Charles M. Allen, Phd. Kind of like Woodstock without the music; three days of peace and love of non-flowering grass-like plants.

After following in Dr. Allen’s footsteps for for many years, I have learned that most-always, when he plans an event, it is usually a dry day and last week was no exception. I don’t know how he does that but must have something to do with communicating on the level of the grass Gods.

There was a total of eight students present, most all, wildlife biologists with the State of Loosiana and Rick Webb, of Looisiana Growers nursery, and myself.

Of course, Dr. Allen knows all the good spots to find cool plants and so he did. In Kisatchie National Forest, our classroom for the three day event, we found lots to see.

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above, click on photo to enlarge, …after we crossed through the Baygall (Pine Hammock), we stepped onto the Holy ground of a sweet Toothache grass meadow, in full flower. An interesting thing about Toothache grass is that it will only sparsely produce inflorescence (flowers) when fire has been used the previous season. A true pyrogenic plant, it needs a burn to actually trigger flowering, and hence, seed. No fire = very few flowers and seed.

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see the youtube video link I shot of the dancing swaying Toothache grass at Byrd’s Creek.

http://youtu.be/Sobt2w1g9yY

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White Topped sedge, Star grass, Dichromena odorata among the diversity of the hillside bog plant community. Not too shabby.

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Long Leaf pine seedling recruitment via natural fire

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Skeleton grass, Gymnopogon species, above

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the wide strapped leaves and fruiting parts of Carex virens at the edge of Fullerton Lake, north of Pitkin, La., Kisatchie. It is helpful, to really be able to appreciate sedges, to look at the flowering parts with a 20X magnification hand lens. It will amaze you, how much there is to these plants when you look at them with magnified eyes.

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Between classes, I was humping it in the Forest, collecting some of the sedges we were working with. This one, Carex intumescens, Bladder Sedge, has nice-sized fruiting heads.

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Biologist Chad Gaspard, of Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries, made a birthday during class. Rick Webb lights up the candles in a Blueberry pie that Top Chef Sue Allen made.

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last week’s photo of our conservation area planting for City of Mandeville/La. DOT, done last November at 190 and Causeway approach, Mandeville, La. IMG_4363

Blue Bachelor Buttons, Lavender-rosey-colored Monarda citriodora, and Coreopsis tinctoria in color with Clasping Coneflower just starting up. These annual plants will die off soon and the growth of perennial grasses and native flowering herbs will begin.

ARBORETUM SPRING BOTANY WALK (Adults)
Saturday, May 30th 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Explore the Arboretum’s native plant exhibits with Dr. Mac Alford, Herbarium Curator and Associate Professor at the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg. After a short indoor discussion of plant taxonomy and ecology, the program will move outside for a field walk through the grounds. Free for members, $5 non-members. Register by May 29.

for more info, call or check the website       http://crosbyarboretum.msstate.edu

 

Gotta go! got work to do….

That’s all, folks!

 

 

Margie Jenkins Field Day and Lecture Series, Friday/ Mr. Joe’s old Petunia field

The LSU AgCenter research station in Hammond will present their spring Field Day and Lecture Series speakers Friday, May 15th. Rick Webb of Louisiana Growers nursery in Amite and Mark Windham, Research Scientist at University of Tennessee, will speak, and the gardens will be open for tours. If you can, make the trip to Hammond to see this fine facility and its expansive gardens and plant talks, do so! more info in below link…

http://www.lnla.org:8080/home/Jenkins%20Lecture%20Series%20and%20Industry%20Open%20House%202015-1.pdf

Spring Fields of Color

Thanks to Dr. Allen Owings, of the Hammond Research Station for answering my burning question about the true identity of the old timey garden petunia I am so familiar with, here in the Central Gulf South.

I had a neighbor in Mississippi back in the 1990’s and 2000’s, Mr. Joesph Burks, that for many years, each year, he grew the most amazing field of “wild” petunias. It wasn’t something he planted each year, but a stand that had naturalized, with the assistance of his helping hands. Mr. Joe and his wife gardened each year in a field next to his old home place. He used an old blue Ford tractor to plant Corn and Tomatoes, Butterbeans and Purple Hull peas. After he was done with the veggies, he would mow the crops down and then in fall of the year, he’d lightly disk the field, stirring up the millions of seeds of what Dr. Owings says might be Petunia violacea. The seed in Mr. Joe’s field would grow slowly all winter and then about April, they’d create a carpet of countless petunia flowers with colors ranging from white to lavendar and pink. It was a stunningly beautiful site from the road and if you walked it, it was, for sure, what it would be like to walk on a cloud. Just heavenly!

If you had the windows open in the car when passing the field in the late afternoon of early morning, when the humidity changed and the fragrance began, the perfumey aroma with the sweetnesss of the scent of Wood Violets, would waft through your car. That image of a petunia field is something I want to see again one day. Mr. Joe was a World War 2 veteran and he has gone on to the great petunia field in the sky, God bless him, but his awesome touch on the land with his blue tractor still energizes and inspires me. He was a quiet guy with a big heart and a gift of a green thumb. He was a friend.

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One capsule of seed from the old petunia plant can contain many many seed. This is a single plant that I started from seed and planted in one of the pots in the garden here at the hacienda in Covington. It had been neglected mostly, all winter and yet has put on a fabulous show for the last two months. Soon the seed will form and I’ll cut and stuff the plant into a bag just before the pods open. I’ll most likely get a tiny crop of plants there below the pot its growing in next year since I’ll probably miss the perfect harvesting time and some will drop. And I will share some seed with Dr. Owings, who mentioned he’d like some. Anybody else up for some?

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a few flowers from my wild-haired petunia, Petunia violacea. nyum nyum. 🙂

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above, Evoking feelings of emotion, the cosmos plantings at City Park, New Orleans, yesterday near Marconi at Tad Gormley Stadium. Lots of people were out and about with jaws open and cameras-a-clicking. Mom’s had their kids posing with I-phones a flickerin’.

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Our Hitchmough-Dunnet-esque six-acre planting (this is about half the field) at an oil refinery north of La Place, Louisiana, yesterday. Mixed into the zillions of Clasping Coneflowers are native annual sunflowers, annual Coreopsis, and Lemon Mint (Monarda citriodora). This is a really wet field, an old sugar cane field, and the Coneflower likes it that way. click to enlarge the pic.

We aim to please.

good day!

Go Micro-Prairies!

wheels on new Louisiana Children’s Museum design, rolling

Several, okay many, wonderful things happened this week in the life of Pastorek Habitats, the business. But best part of the week, as always, is like yesterday, when all the work was done and I made an early-morning break for the Mississippi state line; Pearl River County, that is, for some George W. Bush-like rest and relaxation (only in a Murica!).

Down on the farm its always like heaven on Earth for me. I got a chance to do some spraying in what is to be a new experimental planting area, getting ready for planting next year. Got to walk the prairie gardens. Lots of butterflies, everywhere. Go Micro-Prairies!!

One of the most exciting things to happen this week work-wise was my phone meeting with Architects Debra Guenther and Christian Runge with the firm Mithun. Mithun was chosen for the design of the new Louisiana Children’s Museum which will be located on eight acres in City Park, New Orleans, near the Museum of Art and the Botanical Gardens. Mithun has offices in San Fransisco and Seattle and they’ve been working with the Children’s Museum on the development of the idea of a new facility for several years.

Mithun is an interdisciplinary firm of architects, landscape architects and interior designers, providing integrated design of all those services on the project. Biohabitats’ roll is that of water resource ecologists for the project and Pastorek Habitats as the native plants and soils ecology. Its a real honor to be included in this short list of team members.  🙂

The design process is in full swing and should be finished, with working specifications completed within the next ten months or so.

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above, a few of my favorite things; a cool Prairie Parsley stand, down at the farm in Mississippi. Lots of different insects using it- fun to watch.

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click on the photo to enlarge. in the foreground, is the spring fluff of the extra-fine mass of inflorescences of Winter Bent grass, Agrostis hyemalis, a very common and abundant disturbance-oriented perennial winter-grass that is finishing up now in the natural landscape. Behind it is Sweet Coneflower, Rudbeckia subtometosa, the dark green in the center background, with course-textured Velvet Panicum, Panicum scoparium on the left and the bluish leaves of Switch grass, Panicum virgatum on the right. This is in the garden, at the house in Covington, Louisiana.

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Before I knew what Winter Bentgrass was, I called it Mississippi Tumbleweed because I lived my early adult years, 26 years, in Pearl River County, Mississippi and I always saw it collect on the fence rows in cow fields. The stem of the inflorescence, breaks, becomes detached, and floats away-rolls away in bundles, in the wind, often collecting in large windrows at the field edge. Its a beautiful thing, Winter Bent grass is. Its motional. It moves in the landscape and then around the landscape.

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cool pic of the flower of Mottled Tuberose, Manfreda variegata (foreground), with my son Cale’s “tornado pot” and my ceramic sculpture “Family”, on yellow pedestal. The Tuberose is such a great garden plant, a native of Texas-northern Mexico. I got my start many years ago from Texas nurseryman and radical garden designer Will Fleming. The flowers are all stamen and really unusual but its all about the foliage of Mottled Tuberose. Its like a giant Manfreda virginica, but with dark green leaves that are strap-like and often, 12 to 18 inches long. The rosette of leaves grows low and flat to the ground, no more than a few inches tall; perfectly prostrate, covering a circle of ground and eventually making pups that pop-up from the root. Coolest plant ever? Maybe. Best plant ever? Probably.

Mr. Fleming selects for the really mottle leaf forms since the seedlings vary greatly from heavily mottled to nearly mottless. He likes to put those showy ones in his gardens.

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Here’s a garden with Mottled Manfreda that I planted five years ago in the native garden area at City Park Botanical Garden, New Orleans. It was budding-up a couple of weeks ago when I visited. Mexican Primrose, the pink carpet surrounding it, in spring full-glory.

a very revealing story in this paper written by my friend and mentor, Dr. Malcolm F. Vidrine, at below link

http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1076&context=napcproceedings

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above, for more on the story of our need to protect the health of our watersheds, streams and rivers, is this book by Dr. Vidrine

Also, a notice for the Tall Grass Prairie Center’s -2015 Iowa Prairie Conference: Working Prairies in July via Dr. Bruno “Tee-Bru” Borsari, in Winona, U of Minnnesota – see link

http://www.tallgrassprairiecenter.org/2015-prairie-conference

HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY TO ALL THE MOTHERS ON THIS, MOTHER’S DAY, AND ESPECIALLY TO MY BEAUTIFUL MUM, JANE PASTOREK! (…and to Candi, my wife)

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Crosby and Kisatchie Bog-Baygall trips, May 16th/Lipkin Hill Botanical Area-Old River WMA trip a near-complete success!!

Dr. Wayne Morris will lead a group of wild plant enthusiasts on a field trip to the Crosby Hillside bog and to the Steep Hollow natural area. As far as I know, this is the first trip Crosby has offered the trip to the Steep Hollow site, a place I have wanted to see for many years. Should be a great day, with many folks filling the pews. Be a part of this fun and informative field day. Turn off the computer and TV and get some nature in, ya’ll.

25th Annual Bog and Baygalls Field Trips with Dr. Charles Allen

For 25 years, folks have been meeting for the Bogs and Baygalls event in Kisatchie National Forest. For the last 15 years, this event has been based at the home of Charles and Sue Allen, who live on a property that joins Kisatchie, with the Ouskachitto River in their backyard.

Charles has worked for many years building and managing gardens focused on butterfly attraction. Charles is one of the the leading authorities on Bogs and Baygalls and he has been involved in this fun weekend of events since its started with the help of the late Robert Murray.

I haven’t decided which of these bog events I will attend, but I’m sure they will both be well attended and will be fun-filled days.

Old River WMA Lipkin Hill Botanical Area trip was a success!

We met for the annual field trip at my prairie seed farm Saturday. It was a light crowd, smaller than usual but we were also getting predictions of 60% rain for the day. As it turned out, we finished the four hour event with perfect weather, just as the rain began to come down.

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You know you’re getting close to Lipkin Hill when you start seeing the Indian Pinks,  Spigelia marilandica,in the leaf litter, above, and Red Buckeye, Aesculus pavia.

We missed the Native Camellia, Stewartia malacodendron, in flower, by a day, or maybe a couple of days. Two years ago, when we made the trip last, we were a single day late, finding only clusters of stamens on the plants, and petals of the spent flowers on the ground. A rain had come the night before and beaten the flowers off.

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a tight bud of Native Camellia, a giant at fifteen feet tall and wide. The only blooms that occur are way up high where the branches reach for precious sunlight. A thick canopy of old growth trees covers this north facing slope of this River bluff

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above, a baby Stewartia, a foot or so tall, may be as old as twenty or forty years.

I have been going to Lipkin Hill since 1983. The Stewartias look the same as the first time I saw them. These are ancient plants. My good friend, Dorothy “Dot” Burge, who lived only 500 yards from Lipkin hill since 1945, said that they have stayed the same since she first saw the in the late 1940’s. No telling how old these plants are.

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above, an old Magnolia grandiflora with old native Vitus, muscadine vine, lovingly attached.  Rick and his wife Susan were, at one point, only thirty or so feet away and I could barely make them out, the woods are so dense there.

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above, here everything reaches upwardly. Rick Webb found the prize du jour, the Pyramid Magnolia in bloom. Here he bends the branch over for this photo of heaven right here on Earth. The flower’s about a foot across in size.

To get to Lipkin Hill, we walked a mile or so into the woods until suddenly the trail drops dramatically off the bluff, into the Pearl backwater.

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above, looking west into the beautiful Pearl River backwater, standing on the old logging rail spur bed that was cut into the slope, you see a fine second growth of buttressed Cypress-Tupelo-Water Hickory bottomland forest. In summer, when the floodwaters recede, the backwater ground plain fills becomes a mud-flat filled with White Swamp Milkweed, Asclepias perennis, and Cardinal Flower, Lobelia cardinalis.

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Looking up the trunk of one of the many fifty foot tall Cowcumber Magnolia trees, Magnolia Macrophylla, that fill this west-facing slope of Lipkin. Susan Webb pointed out giant flower petals on the ground that had fallen from the sun filled tops of the Cowcumbers.

Photos of the Week

Coreopsis nudata, found in only one Parish in Louisiana, St. Tammany, on a highway in the south part of the parish, in a pine flat.

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This Coreopsis is an obligate wetland species, not common in the landscape, especially here at the very western edge of its distribution range. click to enlarge photos.

 

 

2 St. Tammany residential pine prairie gardens burned- go team Green!

Saturday began with a cool breeze, clear blue skies and by the 10:00 burn time, we had a steady 10 mile per hour wind with gusts to 15mph coming out of the east and southeast. We planned to burn a 2.5 acre planting, seeded a year ago in January. My client Doug Green did all the work involved in prepping and planting. I just provided seed and guidance. Now we’d do the first controlled burn on it, to trigger natural succession.

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above: here’s a photo of the field after a few diskings (plowings), November 19, 2013. Walking trails and a circular central open space inside the plantings, in green. (click to enlarge)

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above: with the wind kicking from the east and southeast, we started on the western side, close to the north corner. My burn partner Terry Johnson did the honor of lighting it up. Terry, fire manager for the Crosby Arboretum, and I have been burning together for about 15 years.

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after about ten minutes, we were reassured of the strategy and proceeded north (Terry) and south (me) to encircle the filed with our only real tool: fire. Doug helped us out in a big way by running the tractor-spray-rig where and when we needed him.

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as we moved eastwardly, we left a “black line”, a burned area; protection from escaping fire. Once the size of the black line was sufficient, we moved on steadily to the east.

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Terry worked the north edge and I worked the south. this is about 45 minutes into the burn, maybe half way done. We worked a black line on the north and south ends, again, for protection from escape.

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I met Terry on the east side and we wrapped it all up like a large lasso. A full two hours of steady adrenaline pumping was had by all.

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eryngium yuccafolia, a hyper-pollinator species, in the ash, one year after seeding

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Doug went back and forth between Terry and myself, assisting as needed. Team Green got ‘er done.

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central part of the prairie, before….

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…and after.

We did another burn, Terry and I, just a few miles away; a small, half acre pine prairie seeded two years ago- with some wooded areas included.

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above: before…

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…..and after. The prairie area surrounds this tree-shrub area, but I wanted to introduce succession by fire here, as well. My client, Skip Miller, will be happy with the result come this summer.

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Our burn plan for Doug’s pine prairie, certifiz’ed and notoriz’ed. CAUTION! DISLAIMER: Fire is extremely dangerous! Momma told me so! 🙂

horticulture-worthy strains of native grasses for Gulf-influenced landscapes

One of the best things to happen to me in my working career is to have been influenced by a bunch of keen plant people who appreciated and promoted genetic diversity. This influence has helped me see the plants in the landscape with a more discerning eye.

By having the gift of spending time in natural areas, I’ve come across some noteworthy strains of plants that I believe have horticultural promise. Some are genetically unique individuals like you and I and some are entire populations of a single species in a particular location, noticeably different than the typical. Some are just normal, run-of-the-mill.

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Pioneering prairie ecologist Dr. Charles Allen and myself at Chapapeela Sports Park last Sunday in Hammond, Louisiana, checking out for the first time, the lushness of frosted-awesome prairie seeded two years ago in November. Without Charles and his side-kick Dr. Mac Vidrine (and other concerned Biologists), this, and other fabulous prairie gardens around the Gulf Coast region could not have been conceived. photo by Jeff McMillian

Here are a few Central Gulf Coastal plains species and strains worth mentioning:

Switch grass– Switch grass is highly variable in the landscape. Often, when you see lots of it, you’ll see short and tall, upright and rounded, narrow-leafed and wide bladed, blue-leaved and green-leaved. You’ll see variations in color and texture in inflorescence (flower), too. I have a nice dwarf one in my garden that grows about three feet tall in fruit. cule. the old timey selection, Heavy Metal, has been a commonly available cultivar (genetic anomaly) in the hort trade since the mid-1990’s. Northwind, a selection from up above the Mason-Dixon, is an upright and tall form that stays at attention, like a soldier. Cloud Nine is another I’ve grown for many years, getting my first plant from Niche Gardens in the late 1990’s. Its a big sucker, nine ft tall (Get it?) about that wide, too. Dallas Blue I’ve had for several years now and its of course its blue foliaged and decent in that it doesn’t flop and kind of rounded in form and medium texture. A decent plant. I think the perfect Switch for gardens is a fat-fat leaved one about three feet tall and wide, but I haven’t come across it yet. Gail Barton of Meridian Mississippi found a killer selection of Switch on Highway 45 south of Brooksville, Mississippi a few years ago. It is a beautiful grass, a beautiful plant. Its steely blue foliage with a large form about five feet, in inflorescence and a nice fine textured effect when in fruit. The cool thing about Switch grass is you can do large areas from seed really easily. We offer a mix of Switch seed from populations in the Cajun Tallgrass Prairie of Southwest Louisiana. In two years time, you can produce acres of Switch in robust, nearly mature stands.

Little Bluestem grass is said to be (or used to be) the most common sun-loving grass in in uplands(out of the wet) in East Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. It is a high-conservative species, worthy more ornamental use. Northern climate American are and have been selecting for this plant for many years and because of that, people are using them and making economic benefits in horticulture and commerce. We down here in the South are contemplating the matter still. This is an vertically inclined plant plant, its prolific and the beauty of it is more obvious in numbers. You wouldn’t plant a single Bluestem plant in a garden. You’d plant twenty or forty at a time, for effect. There’s strength in numbers, you know. You use Little Bluestem en masse as a element in the landscape. I prairie ecology, little Bluestem is a climax species, providing copies amounts of plants that proliferate in the landscape and when managed well, become a sod. Foliage and stem characteristics are where Little Blue got its name; Blue stems with red nodes and sometimes, the blue color is absent and shades of green dominate a stand. Sometimes the blue color is so intense it looks silver colored. In November, after first frost, Little Blue turns Little Red, and late in winter turns Little Tan. The functional value though is where Little Blue captures its niche. It provides ecological services abound. An interesting note is that Little Bluestem, below I-10 in the Cajun Prairie is associated with facultative wetland species. Normally it is considered a non’-wet loving plant but obviously genetics have adapted to wet ecotones.

Broomsedge/ Virginia Bluestem – since Little Bluestem has been so devastated, Broomsedge (not a sedge at all) is now probably the most common sun-loving upland grass in Louisiana. Its an early succession plant, moved out (in a restoration) by late succession species, Little Blue, typically. However, Broomsedge has some relevance as far as landscaping and horticulture is concerned. It can be managed in perpetuity if done with some skill. It has a most colorful presence in the landscape in the winter; an unusual reddish tan colored foliage, different than Little Blue, and of a slightly different texture. Its easily distinguished by its flattened stem nodes.

Split Beard Bluestem –Split Beard is very similar in habit and form to Little Blue until it blooms and fruits. When in fruit, the trained eye can pick it out of a line-up from a couple of hundred feet way. On I-20, if you happen to catch it in fruit before the mowers come, it creates a cottony, visually-dazzling landscape, whipped by the wind of the semi trucks. The fruit persists for a month or two. A cool, cool plant for horticulture and wildlife.

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above: Split Beard Bluestem in fruit and in the field. click on photo to enlarge

Dwarf Elliots Bluestem -Elliot’s Blue is rarely, if ever, dwarf, but there is a stand of a dwarf strain that I have been closely monitoring for two seasons, now, at a restoration in Louisiana that has horticultural promise for the Gulf coastal plain since most of our Bluestem species get really tall, especially in a garden soil with no root-space competition. An interesting thing is that when you see either Split Beard or Elliot’s, you generally see the other in close proximity. Elliot’s Blue has a similar habit to Little Blue until it blooms and fruits. Its really obvious when the fruit is on board. Fruits are wrapped in an elongated three inch sheath, something quasi-similar to a jack-in-the-pulpit arrangement. A very distinctive identifiable trait. No Bluestems look like it. The dwarf strain is obviously different than typical, and everything else around it is of normal height and form. This is obviously a strain that comes true from seed, hence the size of the stand (presently about 30 x 50 feet).

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above: Elliot’s Bluestem in fruit, and the dwarf stand, about two feet tall.

Dwarf Indian grass -Indian grass is a great prairie garden plant. It is a runner of sorts, but politely so. Again, like with most native grasses planted in a garden situation with loose soil and no root competition, the height and width can double or more, compared to the normal competitive-prairie size. In the competitive world of the prairie, Indian is polite and docile, and only grows a tuft of grass about a foot or so high, with nearly invisible floral stems to six feet, topped with highly attractive and colorful infloresnces. Yellow Indian grass is the common name for this plant since the flower heads are bright and yellowy, robust and unusually large considering the stem diameter. Indian is highly variable genetically with a variety of genetic strains coming from a handful of seed. Often there are steely blue colorations of foliage and differing leaf forms and sizes.

Dr. Susan Barton, U of Delaware (http://canr.udel.edu/faculty/barton-susan/) has made some wonderful discoveries conduction planting experiments with Indian grass. She told me about how she preps the planting area by spraying herbicide repeatedly and then mixes Indian grass seed with saw dust. Then lays the sawdust-seed mix across the ground an inch thick and voila! Instant Indian grass prairie!!!!!

Dwarf Indian in my seed field -years ago, a friend, Gail Baron (yard flower.com), gave me a few cups of Indian grass with origin, as I recall, from somewhere in Mississippi. I planted it out and it has proven to be a particularly dwarf strain. Nice.

Love grass (there are many species) – Love grass should be a good marketable plant just because of its name. It is a very short-statured grass, much wider than its one foot height. Work should be done on this plant simply because it has such a short overall height. And it comes up readily from seed.

Three Awn grass -Aristidas are feathery, fine textured and rather attractive native grasses that create puffs of color and texture in the landscape. Some come up readily from seed. These are relative to the Wire grass, Aristida strict, so common and dominant in Florida and Georgia pine lands but absent from west Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. Generally dwarf in size, most often, about a foot high, wispy and vertical; moved by the slightest breeze. Purty. The best one for horticulture is A. purpurascens.

Narrow Leaf Bluestem – a most promising garden plant and lawn substitute, Schizachyrium tenerum has a short and rounded form with needly-thin leaves, growing about a foot high and 30 inches wide. Its distribution range is a fairly small area, the central  Gulf coast, mainly, with some disjunct populations, east, in eastern Georgia and North Carolina and west to Corpus Christi, Texas. Narrow Leaf Blue is unique in that it is one of the species in the Coastal Prairie of Louisiana (Cajun Prairie) that separates the Tall grass prairie of the midwest from the Tallgrass prairies of the Gulf Coast region. It has something to do with the Gulf influenced coastal pine lands intergrading with the Tallgrass prairie. Its a true Southerner.

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above: Distribution range of Schiz ten

Pineland Dropseed, Sporobolus junceus -what a beautiful and very useful grass this plant is! A favorite of mine. It graced my prairie seed catalogue cover years ago. Prairie Dropseed casts a wide net horticulturally for the potential it has for use in gardens, home and urban prairie landscapes and especially for the no-mow or low-mow native lawn. This plant is so petite, a tiny thing, that gets about six or eight inches in height and maybe a little less wide. The inflorescences are erect barely visible, they’re so thin and fine in texture. Very interesting. Its a clumping tuft with fine textured foliage and is delightful to find en masse in the wild. Am presently working on plantings of it for demonstrations for the last couple of years.

Brownseed Paspalum -Brownseed is a great early succession nurse crop for strarting a prairie garden since it comes on early in dominance and stays until competition moves it out to a lesser roll in the prairie landscape. A good wildlife plant but not much on the eyes. Most folks would say it looks like Bahia grass but it is quite different, actually. Much thinner inflorescences and fruit clusters. Its another Gulf coastal species mostly, with reach into northern area outside the coastal plain. Adaptable from Texas to the Carolinas.

Side Oats Gramma (or Side Oats Grammaw grass)– Boutaloua curtipendula isn’t supposed to be in Louisiana but Botanist Chris Reid showed me a killer naturally occurring stand last year in Cameron Parish, a stone’s throw from the Gulf. He and another expert told me that that is an anomaly and that that stand is probably something that came from seed sowed for forage. I dunno. However, its growing like a weed in the Louisiana coastal Parish of Cameron! That’s big news folks. Big potential there in that genetic strain. I went to collect some seed and or plants last year and it had just been nuked by the Highway dept. or county road crews. Bummer, dude. This species (and for us, this strain) has incredible potential for low-mow, no-mow lawns and is a great garden plant. The closest place to find it naturally near us, other than in Cameron Parish stand is in the Black Belt prairie region where it is not common at all, rare. These Black Belt genetics have potential for trial also, in heavier, higher Ph soils like New Orleans and Baton Rouge.

Eastern Gamma –is a big, big plant. Its a large textured, pale green leaved, rounded plant with flower spikes that radiate outwardly and above the foliage in all directions, from the center. An ancient relative of the corn plant, if you suck on the seed a bit, you’ll see it even tastes like corn. Voted a better plant for bio-fuel than Switch because of its higher sugar content, its also an ornamental plant of note. It can be grown easily from seed but is not as fast as say, Switch grass. But in three years time, you can easily grow several acres by seed and save tons of plant costs while creating large swaths of grassy landscape. Super good fire generator and an excellent wildlife food and cover plant. Also, ook into the use of its far-southern first cousin Florida Gamma grass, rare in the wild but common now via conservation, on highways and shopping mall parking lots in south Florida, Miami area. Cool beans. I have a nice stand of about fifty maturing plants in my home garden here in Covington, trying it out. It seems to be tough as its cousin for me so far.

Go! Micro-Prairies!!!!!

 

 

Monty the Dog Goes to the Farm!/ awesome new LSU Hilltop meadow planting-planning/ City of Mandeville-La DOT pine prairie planting completed/LSU Hilltop Arbo Symposium speakers finalized, announced

 

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Monty the Wonderdog, captured in digital form, on his way to the seed farm in Mississippi the other day. Monty likes fetching sticks and smelling-out deer and other wild critters in the native grass fields. Most of all, though, he likes to stick his head out of the window to get a sense of the neighborhoods along the route. That’s what he’s best at, plus the fact that he’s a certified therapy dog and all. He’s not an amateur dog, he’s a professional! He was pleased with the day overall, he said.   (click on the pic and see him up close. He’s funny.)

I just got the notice for details for speakers for the Hilltop Arboretum’s winter Symposium and what a great line-up it is. I will, of course, be speaking on grass landscapes (duh) for the home garden and the urban environment. The symposium is geared to gardens and garden plants rather than ecological landscapes. It sounds like it will be a fun time with a speaker’s get-together the night before, so I’ll be able to catch up with a few folks I haven’t seen in many years and some I’ve never met. here is the link to the Hilltop Symposium announcement. There’ll be more info coming soon, I’m sure.

http://sites01.lsu.edu/wp/hilltop/adult-programs/symposium/

Yesterday, Doug Reed was in Baton Rouge to discuss the new prairie natural area being designed for the Hilltop Arboretum. Doug is an nationally recognized landscape designer, an LSU grad, principal partner in the firm Reed-Hilderbrand, LLC, of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Doug and I collaborated 3 years ago on the initial design phase of the Hilltop prairie when it was just an idea and we worked together on the super-sleek Repentance Park project in Baton Rouge shortly after that. I hear that I will likely be involved in the final horticultural details and if I get lucky, provide the seed for the actual plantings once the construction of the prairie meadows begin. I was invited to be present at Doug’s presentation to the Hilltop board of directors but am too busy with planting right now to pick my head up. Gotta make hay while the sun shines. Peggy Davis, the Director at Hilltop, organized a field trip to Crosby Arboretum and to my seed farm last summer to get a hands-on feel for what a real restored prairie is. A bus load of people connected to Hilltop visited and walked the Meadowmakers prairie paths. They must have liked what they saw since the project to create real biodiversity via constructed natural areas of meadows is still on! whoot!

Once completed, this planting will provide an outdoor classroom and research area for landscape design and biology students right in the heart of Baton Rouge.

The City of Mandeville’s wildflower conservation planting has been completed as of last Friday. I met with the very capable Herb Piller, a landscape designer with Louisiana Department of Transportation that day. He was interested in the planting process and took a few photos, asked a few questions.

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above, top: the western most planting in Mandeville at the intersection of Highway 190 and Causeway Approach Rd, and below that, the eastern most planting. All complete and ready for seed to stratify! I will be managing these gardens for two years as part of the installation contract. Really nice Long Leaf pines from Louisiana Growers! go Rick!

The burn team got together and did some controlled burning at the seed farm in Mississippi yesterday. It was perfect conditions for a wild fire and thanks to our dedicated volunteers, we got two major sections done without burning the neighborhood down. These were two areas, about four acres altogether, with two years of fuel built-up and the humidity was really high with lots of grass present so we had some really spectacular visuals and adrenaline rushes from the leaping, flaming vegetation. Lots of poppin’ and crackin’ in the low, wet areas between the hill slopes. It was quite the event, ya’ll (don’t try this at home kids)!

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above: My good friend Jim McGee uses the awesome-Terry-Johnson-devised/ Terry Johnson-built, Kabota-mounted, PTO-powered spray rig, to douse the flames as they work into the fire lines at the Meadowmakers seed farm and genetic preserve, Carriere, Mississippi, December 10, 2014. Terry is a old-time good friend, who grew up on a farm in Iowa. He is a farm-taught mechanical engineer who can build and fix anything. He and Jim both have a heart of gold.

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a good burn was had by all, ya’ll 🙂

Mandeville’s new 1 acre Long Leaf Pine prairie preserve

Thanks to the forward thinkers at Mandeville City Hall and the Mandeville City Planning staff, the one acre island created (two islands, actually) by the roadway intersection at Highway 190 and the east Lake Ponchartrain Causeway approach will soon be completed. The planting is inspired by the Long Leaf pine prairies that were once so prevalent in the Parish and the entire Central Gulf Coastal region. Tim Bailey, a local landscape contractor and Prairie Dog, Inc. (Pastorek Habitats, LLC.), have been chosen to collaborate on the planting and management of the project. The planting is just east of the Causeway approach, check out the google maps to locate. You may have to click and enlarge the photos below, to see.

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I’ve worked this past spring and summer, getting the prep work done and Tim has just completed the tree plantings; a few Live Oaks located in the outside of the pine prairie and Long Leaf Pine and Cherry Bark Oaks, chosen specifically because they would be a natural companion for the prairie and because they are pyrogenic (they love fire!). The plan is to use annual controlled burns as the preserve’s main management device.

Adam Perkins, a Landscape Architect based in Hammond (Dufreche and Perkins), and Maggie Gleason, Landscape-Urban Forestry Inspector for the City of Mandeville’s Planning Department collaborated on the planning and design of the landscape. Adam, Tim and I all worked together at Chapapeela Park prairie landscape in Hammond, which is a jewel in the crown of Hammond’s public Park system. Adam’s graphics are great. They explain the project very well.

Gotta give credit to Chuck Allen and Mac Vidrine, those crazy-brilliant-Cajun-Prairie-cats, because without the help of the how-to science they developed, the preserve would probably have become a large tree filled lawn that would have to be mowed in perpetuity, or something really boring like that. By approaching the “approach” this way, we get awesome wildflower diversity and eventually, fire on the ground!!! We also get another model of what can be done in the urban context with ecological landscaping; totally logical.

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bird’s eye view looking north (click on the photos to enlarge)

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looking southeast, lighter green is pine prairie, darker green is mowed turf grass

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looking south, with City of Mandeville City Administrative complex on right in white

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Signs identify the pine prairie area as “wildflower preserve”, a series of posts delineate the prairie from mowed turf for maintenance staff when they are mowing and to create a neat strip of highly managed vegetation that will contrast beautifully with the wildness of the blanket of prairie. Caroline Dorman, Louisiana’s pioneering promoter of “the wild things” would be proud!

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This is a big deal for Mandeville, ya’ll. And for us, too! . And for Pine prairie!!! We will be planting the first week of December and I hear that the local Louisiana DOT representative and some other City leaders want to be present at some point when we are seeding to see what we do and how we do it. There seems to be a lot of interest in this project. The City Leaders seem invested in more ways than one. Will keep you (all three of you) posted on progress, as it happens.

three good books on Long Leaf Pine and Pine prairies

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/892456.Looking_for_Longleaf

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13790960-longleaf-far-as-the-eye-can-see

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15809827-forgotten-grasslands-of-the-south