first frost heralds climactic end to long prairie season

October in the prairie brings on a rush of flowering activity. Many late season species of plants are just getting cranked up about now, making their way to flowering before first frost arrives. Likewise, activity of pollinators increases as so many species of flowering plants come into peak bloom and availability of nectar becomes abundant.

Here on the Gulf coast where our growing season is spread out for such a long duration, spring and summer flowering plants have long finished, stepping aside for the prairie crescendo triggered by the shortening of days.

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False Foxglove, a fairly common Louisiana plant

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A white colored form of Gerardia shows up occasionally.

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And so do the caterpillars of the Common Buckeye Butterfly. Its not uncommon to find one or more of these on each plant.

The hallmark of the fall prairie aesthetic along with late blooming Salvia, Asters, Goldenrods, Blazing stars, and so many other species, are the grasses, the vibrant bones of the prairie. Light refracting grasses shine in the fall and winter season, providing structure and form, beauty and robustness; exuberance.

Here in the Gulf coastal plain, prairie is a year-round feature for man and creature.

In the ecology of restored prairies that are grown from seed, grasses are the part of the landscape that densely covers the ground and is the least hospitable toward weedy species – old field weeds. The southern native prairie grass doubles as a nurse crop for perennial prairie wildflowers. All find their niche – and grow and fight for space, nutrients and moisture, root zone – a real fight for individual survival.

Its so fun and exciting each year to see and feel the liveliness of all the activity in a garden such as this.

 

False Foxglove is a great plant to try from seed. So easy. Its almost a guarantee you’ll get a stand of plants from a tiny bag of seed. It thrives with a little disturbance. Just collect seed by stripping the stalks with your hands any time, now until first frost. Put them in a paper bag and keep dry. Sow the seed whenever, in crudely prepared soil. They’ll grow!



Repentance Park, City of Baton Rouge, La., an urban park with a grassy flair!

Indian grass, it turns out, happens to be an effective low maintenance groundcover for an extreme-slope large scale landscape condition.

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above, the foliage of Indian grass is blue green, a stark contrast to the dark green canopy of Southern Magnolia.

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click to enlarge photos

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Golden yellow flowering heads of Yellow Indian Grass – of local, Louisiana genes. BR Convention Center on left. Different grasses species and different horticultural selections of some grasses have varying characteristics that can be exploited, useful for many horticultural applications. 3500 Indian grass plants were grown as one-year-old plugs for this garden planting, planted three years ago.

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Baton Rouge’s City Hall looms in the distance as Indian grass solidly solves slippery slope erosion issue, while making a great color and texture contrast with Carissa Holly, bottom right  – Repentance Park gardens, designed by Reed-Hilderbrand, Landscape Architects/ Reich, Associates, Landscape Architects/ Pastorek Habitats, llc.

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Louisiana Department of Transportation/ University of Louisiana at Lafayette prairie planting is rockin’

This La DOT prairie garden is about two acres in size, just west of New Iberia, Louisiana, at Highway 90. September 27, 2016. It was planted in November of last year – still a whippersnapper, yet.

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above, January 16, 2016, google earth

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above, May 6, 2016, google earth

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September 27, 2016 – Ryan Duhon, DOT Supervisor and project partners UL Prof Jim Foret and Mark Simon stand in the shade of “Mr. Al”, the giant transplanted Live Oak tree, surrounded by lush first year prairie growth. We saw many nice maturing flowering clumps of Little Bluestem grass everywhere – some fistulosa Bee Balm, Hyssop Leafed Thoroughwort (HLT), and a few very hip Clustered Bushmint that were scattered here and yonder. There were lots of Boltonia aster – typical for a first-year seeding. And there were a few hundred giant cloud-puffs of Late Flowering Thoroughwort (LFT) Eupatorium serotinum (the white flowering plant in the photo) – I guess you could say LFT looks a little weedy but its one of our best butterfly plants and it happens that it blooms just in the window of time for Monarch butterfly migration, late Sept to late October. Such a great pollinator plant! You gotta get you some, folks!

In prairie ecology from seed, LFT is replaced by through natural succession, a lack of soil disturbance. With planting (soil disturbance), LFT fills the site and over time it fades as LFT colonizes.

LFT is a gangly fellow, four to six feet tall while LFT is typically about two or three feet short.

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Eupatorium serotinum, a generalist species, is associated as much with woodlands as it is with prairie. A commonly found disturbance-oriented plant considered to be an exceptional late season butterfly nectar source – a worthy pollinator species. map, BONAP

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Eup hyssoppifolium is limited to high quality herbaceous grasslands of the Gulf and Atlantic coastal plain, etc. From seed it establishes easily and is prolific seed (plant) producer.

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Eup Serotinum is found easily in every Parish in Louisiana, a very common roadside plant- Eup Hyssop, is not so easily found, limited to high quality, generally fire managed, sites. (above images Allen and Thomas – Vascular Flora of Louisiana)

Eupatoriums are an important part of our native flora with 40 plus species and subspecies found in Louisiana. In a prairie you’ll often find many species growing together. Valuable plants they are.

After our visit with Ryan, Mark, Jim and I went out to Cade Farm, the ULL, School of Geosciences Living Laboratory to see the new seed storage and educational  facilities being built and to see the site of the new four acre prairie garden, to be planted this November. Nice.

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National Guard prairie making hay while the sun shines

Pretty fun to walk the fields at the National Guard facility in Franklinton last week. There are acres of cover crop of Sida, Zinnia, Purple Basil, brown-top Millet with lots of Buckeyes, Sulfurs, Fritillaries and Swallowtail butterflies a-fluttering about – many many butterflies. Sida rhombifolia is an amazing early succession weedy plant that really brings in the butterflies, skippers and what have you. Lots of pollinator activity there, ya’ll – how fun!

 

Sida is anything but a good ornamental plant. Its a weed, really. From ten feet away, you can’t see the tee-tinesy flower, but a closer look at the flower and you can see how it might be related to the hibiscus family.

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sida-cordifolia

The stems of the plant are tough stuff, nearly unbreakable, by hand. Its a disturbance oriented plant but declines and eventually disappears from prairie managed landscapes due to intense plant competition and from the lack of soil disturbance in managed prairie.

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LaDOT eastbound I-20 Rest Area pollinator garden at Tremont is showing signs of progress in spite of a late planting date. Who would have thunk?

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Four months after planting, we have some good looking identifiable inflorescences of a few of the Little Bluestem plants, above. Seeing the Bluestem plants with flower stalks helps develop a search image to identify seedlings without flowering stalks, below. Its really hard to ID grasses without flowering, fruiting parts.

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Go Team Blue!

Perennials are generally super slow to grow and prairie garden is made mostly with perennials; grasses and all. Seedlings like these take time, to make enough roots to mature, to make a flower and then fruit. It takes a few years to develop a dense prairie sod from seed. So what are you waiting for?

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cool prairie plants that double as outdoor ornamentals and indoor arrangements!

A few prairie plants I’ve enjoyed so much this year – natives and nonnatives – consider them for ornamental plantings. Find yourself some Rudbeckia subtomentosa, Sweet Coneflower, and you’ll have a plant worthy of the finest spot in your garden.

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Rudbeckia subtomentosa has a long bloom period, two full months. Here it is in flower with Wendy’s Wish Salvia and Amastad Salvia, Mikania (not in flower), in a semi shade spot in my garden in Covington, last week. Its been in flower since August 1. Sweet coneflower takes mixed shade or sun and is tough as nails, an evergreen ground cover in winter.

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cool, dude “Henry Eiller” Rudbeckia subtomentosa, a northern selection, northern genes, of R. sub. I’ve been admiring this plant in my friend Gail’s garden for years. Very unique indeed, no?

 

Kosteletskya (Hibiscus) virginica var. ‘Immaculate”, the white flowering form of Coastal Hibiscus, one found by Landscape Architect/ plantsman John Mayronne in St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, in the 1990’s. Its now a common specialty garden plant. Notice Rudbeckia subtomentosa in flower, in the background, Indian Grass in foreground. Plants purchased from Rick Webb’s Louisiana Growers Nursery (wholesale). A six footer, Immaculate is upright and flowers in late September. Flowers open at night and finish up when the afternoon heat arrives.

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http://www.nichegardens.com/catalog/item.php?id=1558&PHPSESSID=4dfc8ef8a53ffd7b7311adfbd37d6ca2

One of the most exciting and fun plants I’ve had the chance to grow this year is African Basil, Blue Basil, a non-native. Over the years I’ve dabbled in Basil cultivation – really like to use Sweet Basil and Thai Basil and of course purple leafed Sweet Basil, etc., etc. but planted this year about 20 or so pots, from Stelz Nursery, and how amazing is this plant, constantly full of Bumble Bees and even Hummingbirds taking a sip every now and then. Some Bumble bees even bed down at night right on the foliage – they can’t seem to get enough of the stuff! wow. amazing plant for sure.

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Cacalia ovata in hand in a cool seed field – Tangipoahoa Parish, La.

sweet prairie in all its subtle glory, above

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October 13, 2016 Marc Pastorek Presentation to City Council on status of prairie garden, City of Mandeville, 6:00, at Community Center across from City Hall
October 17, 2016 – Master Gardeners of Greater New Orleans – Prairie Gardening for pollinators via seed – East Bank Regional Library 4747 West Napoleon Ave., Metairie, LA 70001.
November 2, 2016 – 2016 Smart Growth Summit, Baton Rouge Louisiana –
Session Details
NATIVE PLANTS, URBAN ECOLOGY & SMART GROWTH PLANNING
When: Wednesday, November 2nd, 1:15pm-2:45pm
Where: Hartley/Vey Studio, Shaw Center for the Arts
Speakers:
Marc Pastorek, Founding Partner and Landscape Designer, Pastorek Habitats, LLC
Robert Seemann, Program Director, Baton Rouge Green
MODERATOR: Ryan Benton, Designer, CPEX
December 2, 2016 – Master Naturalist Urban Ecology workshop, New Orleans City Park

 

http://summit.cpex.org/2016-agenda/

for native plant and ecology events email Dr Allen at native@camtel.net

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the genus Sida, Louisiana

by Charles Allen

The genus Sida (teaweed) includes five native herbaceous annuals or perennial species in the Malvaceae. The stems are tough, and the plants are distinctly tap-rooted. The leaves are alternate and simple, with pinnate major veins and obvious stipules. The inflorescences are axillary and solitary flowers with pedicels that vary in length. The flowers are perfect and regular, with five sepals, five orange-yellow to yellow petals, and numerous stamens that are united into a tube around the ovary. The ovary is superior, and the fruit is a ring of five to ten carpels that separate at maturity. The caterpillars of common and tropical checkered skipper plus the gray hairstreak use Sida plants for food. The plants are also host to the caterpillars of four moth species including the tersa sphinx.

A. Mericarps, styles, and stigmas 5; stem with a spine subtending each leaf; leaves usually truncate to subcordate at the base……………………………………………………………………………………………. S. spinosa
A Mericarps, styles, and stigmas (6-) avg. 10 (-14); stem lacking spines subtending the leaves; leaves usually cuneate to rounded at base…………………………………………………………………………………………..B

B(A). Leaves narrowly elliptic to linear, (3-) 4-20× as long as wide…………………………..C

B. Leaves elliptic-rhombic, mostly 2-3 times as long as wide…………………………………….D C.(B) Pedicels shorter than 2 cm ……………………………………………………………………… S. elliottii
C Pedicels 2-6 cm long ………………………………………………………………………………S. lindheimeri

D(B). Leaves and branches borne distichously; stipules usually falcate, several-veined.. …………………………………………………………………………………………… S. acuta

D. Leaves and branches borne spirally; stipules linear, 1 (-3)-veined .S. rhombifolia

The most common and widespread species is common teaweed (Sida rhombifolia) also known as ironweed and Cuban jute. It is a somewhat dark color and very common with reports from all 64 parishes.

The second most common Sida is spiny teaweed with a short spine subtending each leaf. It is yellow green and fairly widespread in agricultural areas. It is reported from 56 parishes and these are the eight parishes where it is not reported: Acadia, Avoyelles, Beauregard, Sabine, St Helena, St. James, Tangipahoa, and Washington.

The other three species are uncommon to rare. Sida acuta (common wireweed) is reported from East Baton Rouge, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Plaquemines parishes. Sida elliottii (Elliott’s fanpetals) is reported only from Cameron, East Baton Rouge, and St. Tammany parishes and Sida lindheimeri (showy fanpetals) only from Cameron and East Feliciana parishes.

 

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-biggest-missed-opportunity-in-dc/2016/09/16/93993ed8-79e1-11e6-bd86-b7bbd53d2b5d_story.html?utm_term=.2c25e7883bd7

keep bugging me, man!

Habitat Conversion

Convert a patch of your lawn into prairie and find a world you would never discover otherwise; the plants, the patterns, the bugs!!!

Insects are not just beneficial, they’re essential! Bugs are good. Ask any Mother bird who is fluttering about in search of food for her chicks and she’ll tell ya. “chirp, bugs are good for my bebes! …..chirp chirp!”

“A single pair of breeding chickadees must find 6,000 to 9,000 caterpillars to rear one clutch of young”, according to Doug Tallamy, a professor of entomology and wildlife ecology at the University of Delaware. Even though seeds and berries are nutritious winter staples, insects are best for feeding growing fledglings. Surprisingly, insects contain more protein than beef, and 96% of North American land birds feed their young with them. Although fly maggots and spiders might curl your lip, to a chickadee, these are life-saving morsels full of fat and protein.

If you’re not a fan of six legged organisms, you should curl up with Dr. Tallamy’s book Bringing Nature Home. It will reveal the complexity of nature through bugs. or just pull up any Doug Tallamy youtube video.

Then you’ll see!

Personal Outlook Conversion

What comes along with growing a prairie landscape besides flowery landscapes and bugs, is something you’ll find within yourself, a sense of satisfaction that goes far beyond what a garden can bring; a lesson in gratefulness and gratitude, a lifetime of beauty, joy and wonder.

Easily Demonstrating Pollinator Response

Wonderful things happen when you prairie garden. Plant Monarda punctata, Spotted Horsemint, and see a world of beauty and intrigue develop before you, from the tiniest seeds. Horsemint is a mid-succession to late succession species that comes up easily from seed (its a weed) in a prepared soil. It competes and proliferates over time. Kids! try this at home!

 

after a week of overcast rainy weather, the pollinators insects are out en masse, and very active, taking advantage of a first dry sunny day – this was planted in November 1998 – Pastorek Habitats-Meadowmakers’ seed farm – Carriere, Mississippi. What you can’t see clearly in the video, are many polllinator insects – working the Horsemint flowers for nectar. I walk right through the bees and wasps and they don’t bother me a bit – they’re too busy to notice. 🙂

 

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Spotted Horse Mint is a highly aromatic plant with all parts having a pleasant citrusy scent.

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above, a tiny native bee dances the Watusi in the disc of a Compass Plant flower – at the farm – tell me where you’ve seen one of these bee’s lately?

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Ville Platte’s Louisiana State Arboretum’s native prairie developing into a nice sod

The Louisiana State Arboretum prairie garden is near the arrival area, at the Park’s Visitor’s Center, adjacent to the parking lot.

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planted in the winter of 2012 with seed provided by Pastorek Habitats, these gardens have developed into a decent representation of what an attractive prairie habitat can be. The seed was collected from the Cajun Prairie Restoration site and other relic prairie areas in southwest Louisiana.

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Sabatia, Rose Gentian, above

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Green Milkweed

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obviously not my hand, ha – Kim Hollier, Interpetive Ranger at the Arboretum, holds the flowering head of a member of the Carrot Family, a “hyper-pollinator” species, Eryngium yuccafolia, Button Snakeroot.

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above Liatirs, Blazing Star, and a very happy Gulf Fritillary butterfly, foreground, with a Switch grass mass, in background.

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Eastern Amberwing Dragonfly

(photos by Arboretum Interpretive Ranger Kim Hollier)

 


 

Narrow-leaf Mountain Mint – pollinator plant profile

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Mt. Mint flowering clusters make a good landing pad for butterflies

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Even though the flower clusters are tee-tiny and really need to be examined by using a hand lens to truly appreciate them, they can be quite showy in the landscape when in found in large numbers. Generally speaking, when you find this plant in the wild, it is usually a sign, an indicator, of high quality vegetation. Its a nearly carefree garden plant, with annual cutting back of spent stalks, the only chore needed to keep it looking at its best. In nature, fire does this. No insects that I have ever seen cause it any damage. They are probably too intoxicated by its sweet nectar to care about eating the plant.

Mountain Mints are highly aromatic. All parts of the plant have minty scented qualities and can be used to make tea and as a culinary spice.

I don’t remember ever having lost a plant in a garden and in fact it readily multiplies; it proliferates!

Plantings that I did in my seed field many years ago are now large masses that have spread and become the dominant feature in the landscape, moving out other exotic and early succession species.

A plant grown from seed becomes, over a three year period, a clump about a foot or so in diameter. The clumps increase in size over the years, becoming a dense ground cover, a green carpet an inch or two high in the cool of winter. When in bloom, at its peak, its stands about two feet tall.

Gardening with Narrow-leaf Mountain Mint is so simple – easier than tying your shoe. Propagate it by division by separating individual plants from the mature clumps. Take cuttings from vegetative growth just as the stems become rigid (June) and well before they begin to elongate and bud up to flower.

Pycnanthemum tenuifolium copy

above, Like many prairie species, Pycnanthemum tenuifolium, has an extensive range of distribution. You’ll find it in prairies relics in the eastern half of the country. (source, BONAP)

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In Louisiana, its generally out of the river flood plain parishes, but just about everywhere else. (source Vascular Flora of Louisiana)

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from Charles Allen’s Edible Plants of the Gulf South

 



 

City of Mandeville / La. Dept of Transportation “Wildflower Conservation Garden” (that apparently no one notices! ha!) Feeds the Insect Masses!

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above, some schmuck standing next to one of the dozen or so Long Leaf Pine trees in the City of Mandeville prairie, a prairie garden grown from awesome local-gene, Pastorek Habitat seed. Nice Ragweed in the photo foreground – the yellow flowers are likely Coreopsis linifolia

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saweet! Impressed, huh!

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a nice patch of mature Bothriochloa, above

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a stand of Florida Paspalum has arrived on the scene, above

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…and the first Rough Leaf Goldenrod will bloom this year…yay!

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some good sized polulations of Clustered Bushmint _Hyptis alata

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and some Spotted Horsemint, too…

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Little Bluestem grass, a conservative species, starts its late-summer reach to the sky, with flowering stalks (inflorescence) that will produce viable seed – the proliferating garden

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above, the first Liatris to bloom so far in the Mandeville garden, shows its adolescent floral spikes. Not sure which species – didn’t look. but could be pycnostachya, spicata or acidota. These and many other perennial plants will start to mature enough to start colonizing within the Bluestem structure, coloring up the landscape over time.

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above, 25 years of Liatris pycnostachya proliferation in Cajun Prairie Society restored prairie, Eunice, La., the result is a quite unusual and stunningly beautiful landscape, produced via seed. This garden has been the inspiration for my last twenty plus years of work. Dr. Charles M. Allen and his magical botanical creation, co-instigated by his friend and colleague Dr. Malcolm F. Vidrine, succeeded in their effort to establish a restored prairie in which to study prairie Ecology and restoration. Ten years ago there were just a smattering of the Liatris in this field, its only in the last several years that it has proliferated to this point. (September 2014) (click on photo to enlarge)

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Liatris pycnostachya, remnant prairie, Cameron Parish, Louisiana

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Laitris seed, magnified

The Southeastern U.S. pine landscapes are often called Long Leaf Pine-Bluestem plant communities because these two species were once the dominant species, generally speaking. Today it is not common to find either one of these in wild landscapes.

When I stopped in last week to see the Mandeville garden, the insect species were everywhere flying above, and nectaring on flowering plants. As I waded through the planting, grasshoppers, bees, skippers and moths darted away from me to a safer perch – and the sky was filled with hundreds and hundreds of Dragonflies.

 

the one + acre Mandeville Garden is at the corner of East Causeway Approach and Louisiana State Highway 190 – go check out all the critters, see it for yerself, ya’ll! its bad-ass.

Charles M. Allen Phd plant identification classes – see below link – these are excellent, intense classes in which to learn more about plant taxonomy

Sept 10-11 edible plant workshop – Allen Acres B and B

Sept 13-15 basic plant id workshop – Allen Acres

Sept 20-22 Wetlands Plant id workshop – Allen Acres

Sept 24 Pollination Celebration

https://tpmgblog.wordpress.com/pollination-celebration-2016/

Sept 24-25 Prairie Conference – Lafayette, La

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event;jsessionid=35FA525E0215A325CCC9ECB3F93A6C0F.worker_registrant?llr=ejjbmvjab&oeidk=a07ecyp33k35061afd9

Sept 27-29 Graminoid (grass identification) workshop – Allen Acres

Sept 30-Oct 2 Butterfly Blast – Allen Acres

Oct 4-6 basic plant workshop (Poplarville, Ms)

Oct 8-10 basic plant workshop – Allen Acres

Oct 17-18 edible plant workshop – Allen Acres

Oct 25-27 basic plant id workshop – Allen Acres

Oct 29-30 edible plant workshop – Allen Acres

November 4-5 plant id workshop, Belle Chasse, La

Nov 6 edible plant workshop – half-day – Belle Chasse, La

 

for more info on these dates contact Dr. Charles Allen @   native@camtel.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

will work for prairie!

Lots of fab stuff happening at the Ponderosa ..and beyond…

Processed precious seed Monday that I gathered from our family farm in Pearl River County, Mississippi. A righteous collection it was, on a beautiful September Sunday afternoon. Below, an old proverb says, a bird in hand is better than three or more in the bush, or something like that.

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the main focus of the effort was to get a bunch of Monarda fistulosa and Monarda lindhiemerii seed, the large rounded seed head in the middle. This field has acres of the stuff, and fills the fields full of pink and white when they’re in bloom. The white seed heads, above, at bottom-left, are of the fragrantly aromatic White-Leafed Mountain Mint, a favorite plant of mine. At ten o’clock, tucked between my index and middle finger is a tiny cluster of grey-ish seed heads of the illustrious Narrow-Leafed Mountain Mint. At eleven o’clock is the elongated head of the distinctly Coastal Prairie species Rudbeckia texana (nitida). At high noon is the demure but mui grande, Rudbeckia grandiflora, and, next to that, Rudbeckia hirta, which is next to Ashy Sunflower, at 3 o’clock. All of these are needed in adding to seed mixes, when applicable. And all are originally from the dozen or so, Cajun Prairie remnants, found and preserved by Dr. Mac Vidrine and Dr. Chuck Allen and the other Cajun Prairie pioneers-volunteers, way back when. Go micro-prairies!

 

Go west, old man…

Loaded up the trailer with the home-made superlative spray rig onto the back of the Kubota for a trip west to do some Tallow-whacking. Spent a grand mid-morning with my soil-loving bud, King of the Cajun Calm, Jim Foret, who has, just recently, pulled off a regular coup by getting permission to develop a three acre prairie garden at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette, Cade Farm. Additionally, Professor (Generalissimo Jim) Foret and Cade Farm manager, Mark Simon, will prepare for and plant a demonstration garden of native-gene Switch grass, about two acres. They already have a two or three acre planting of Switch grass, but it is Alamo Switch, which is a cultivar with genes from up above the north Texas line somewhere. eeww!!!!!

The UL planting with be research based and all native; local genes.

 

Cajun Prairie Restoration site work, Eunice, Louisiana; Woody-plant slaughter! Oh, the humanity!!!

Did a day of spraying Tallows and other woody plants in the afternoon on Wednesday at the Cajun Prairie Habitat Restoration site in Eunice. I think I got a good dent done there. It was so fun. Hooray for mechanical equipment!!!!

 

Hangin’ out in Hackberry

Headed to Hackberry, Louisiana for Thursday morning, where I met and worked with Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries folks, Louisiana Natural Heritage field botanists Chris Reid, Chris Doffitt and Sairah Jared at a very cool and mostly flat piece of ground on a private ranch, where only the hippest and happiest cows dine. Our objective was to accomplish an unforgiving slaughter of Chinese Tallow trees on what is a very large and biologically significant Coastal Prairie remnant. Chris says that this is one of the most promising of the restores he is working with in terms of the private land owners being open to the idea of restoring native prairie and going all-in on what is real, live, native prairie, complete with mounds. It was like walking on air out there; levitation. Okay, actually, it was like walking on air in a very hot open-air baking-oven; I felt kinda like a thanksgiving turkey. But other than it being a wee warm, it was very enlightening to see yet another one of these treasures, a landscape-scale coastal prairie remnant. This is third I have been invited to in the last year. Whoop-whoop!

Hackberry, is one of many places in Louisiana where the world ends, basically.

You can’t easily get there from here, as the old saying goes.

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We met at Brown’s grocery Store, where you can get Hackberry House Slippers (shrimping boots) (sometimes called Delcambre Nikes) in three different colors; the typical white, green-camo and pink-camo. Yea! Take that, Rodeo Drive!

I drove behind Chris Reid, who knew the trail to the prairie ranch site.

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miles and miles we went, across the idyllic fresh water marshes and this, a man-made road through Black Lake.

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it was pretty, ya’ll.

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…we went, and went and went, westwardly…. and then we went some more…

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We finally arrived at the ranch. Nice Mima mounds were scattered in the grazed-mowed fields, before we reached our final destination.

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you can see to the left of Ms. Brahma, a four foot tall Mima mound. Pretty things, both.

I was there to share the technique I have been working on, for killing Tallow trees, which are a problematic plant when it comes to restoring prairie. We were using a brand-name of herbicide called Clearcast. Last year I painted some full-strength Clearcast onto some Tallows with a paint brush, in the yard here in Covington. The stuff out-right killed the Tallows, dead as a door nail, no root sprouts at all, ya’ll. We have been using Clearcast at the restorations in Eunice because it is deadly as a foliar spray and mostly selective to Tallow, but the full strength basal application is a new approach with promise. whooo-hooo! Herbicides rock!!!! get some!

Chris Reid was interested in trying the technique, and so I did an application and safety demo. I got them all instructed and off they went into the Tallow groves on-foot. Instead of a paint brush, they used a back pack sprayer with Clearcast and a crop oil for extra penetrating-ability. Then I saddled up the Kubota for some mechanical spray acrobatics-aerobics. Its all in the wrist, ya’ll.

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mixing the backpacks with stuff. photo by Sairah Jared

I think we did some real good. Got ‘er done! You can get a feel for the landscape we were working in on the south end of the 110 acre site by looking at my you-tube video link, below. I was foliar spraying, gunning for Chinese Tallow. You’ll see the Tallows in green in the field edges and lots of four-foot-tall Hibiscus lasiocarpa, a fuzzy leafed, bold herb, odd and grey as it’s leaves are. Its common on the Mima mound prairie landscapes I’ve seen in southwestern Loosianner.

 

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after we worked, we took a pleasure ride to the north end of the prairie restoration area where its open. Chris Reid said that this north side is the higher end of the field and so there was not as much woody plant encroachment. What a treat, indeedy!

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Here, a nice specimen of Ovate Leafed Cacalia, a beautiful, tall-growing perennial that pollinators seem to relish, in the mix with Little Bluestem grass and the tiny bright yellow sparkles of Soft Golden Aster, on a sweet treeless mound.

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holding a panicle of Sporobolus pyramidatus, Whorled Dropseed grass, in a bare saline area near a pimple mound, my first time seeing this. you can make out a better image of the seed head- one is laying over at the very top of the image against darker color in the frame, very skeletal

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Narrow Leafed Bluestem, a Coastal Prairie and Long Leaf Pine understory endemic just up a foot or so from the base of a mound.

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The Mima mounds are plentiful here, and generally uniform, showing up in this image as green vegetation. “The woody plants are generally up on the mounds” Chris said. Here, a ten foot Tallow tree plays King of the Mountain. However, if Chris has his way, it won’t be king for long.

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…this mound, a four footer, seen here behind the group, was topped with Indain grass and Little Bluestem and had many Liatris acidota, Sharp Blazing Stars, just finished blooming, wrapping around the base of the mound. The mounds are wonderful little gardens with fantastical arrangements of flowering plants and grasses, taking advantage of the gradient with high and dry plants up top, wetter loving plants at the base and a mix between, all native. From left to right, Sairah Jared, Chris Doffet, center, and Chris Reid, on the right. Botonia asteroides/ difusa is the white and Flat-topped Golderod is the yellow in the foreground.

hackberry farm place

the farm house area in Google-earth, with mowed and grazed Mima mounds, click on the photo to enlarge

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the prairie field of a little over 100 acres, and the trees, in green, we were working on

hackberry south

Just south of the farmhouse = cool landscape

 

Sandy Hollow Wildlife Management Area trip

Took a quick trip yesterday to scope out a seed collecting prospect, at Sandy Hollow Wildlife Management Area. I’d been wanting to see the site for a few years or more. It was worth the time spent. Sandy Holler is a great natural Pine prairie site with really significant herbaceous vegetation, with not-particularly-significant woodlands.

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Big Bluestem grass is plentiful at Sandy Hollow, seen here in front of the blue pick-up. Its fairly rare to find it in Tangipahoa Parish. You can certainly get an idea of what vegetation looked like in the Parish by seeing this Pine prairie remnant.

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They don’t call it Sandy Hollow for nuthin’. Its sandy there. Bush Mint, a cool plant, yea, growing in a more dry condition than normal.

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Liatris sqarrulosa, Southern Blazing Star or Red-neck Blazing Star

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This particular seedling of Southern Blazing Star had really dark purple colored bracts, and stood out among the others as superior in form. Really nice.

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I saw lots of Swallow Tails out there. This one, I think, a Giant Swallow Tail, but there were some Spice Bush Swallow Tails a’nectarin’, too. Some happy, smiling butterflies a-flutterin’ around in the sun.

 

Louisiana Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects – Built Environment – Merit Award – goes Repentance Park Landscape Architecture design team – Go Micro-prairies!!!!

Repentance Park, Located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Landscape Architect:  Reich Associates

Pastorek Habitats, LLC consulted on the Indian grass slope meadows at Repentance Park, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. We also provided the seed for, and contracted the growing of the 3500 Indian grass plants (thanks Gail Barton!) planted as a natural meadow garden. We worked through Reed Hilderbrand, Cambridge, Mass., who, with subconsultants Reich and Associates, and Suzanne Turner Associates, of Baton Rouge, collaborated to provide construction documents and planting and management strategies for this steeply-sloped garden at the City Hall/ Old State Capitol/ Convention Center area. Other collaborators were the City of Baton Rouge and the landscape construction contractor, George Francise Landscapes.

LEED Project Army National Guard facility in Franklinton, Louisiana contract ink is dry!!!!!!

We will start on the preparation for construction of natural meadow-prairie grass areas at the Franklinton Readiness Center, a National Guard construction project, with the first herbicide application planned for this week. We are the designers of the meadow areas, in collaboration with Dufreche-Perkins Landscape Architecture. Go Army!

THIS JUST IN!!! HITCHMOUGH VIDEO OF PRESENTATION AT LSU, APRIL, 2015!!! Thanks, Landscape Architecture Prof. Wes Michaels!  and thanks Dr. Hitchmough!

http://coadmediasite.lsu.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=34967c0816f14433ac5dd36ce335030f1d

 

general and advanced taxonomy classes / natives featured at Oct. Hammond event

 

For those wanting to learn more about native plants and natural things, several events are upcoming that might be of interest. Dr. Charles Allen, one of the leading experts on native plants in the southeastern U.S. is holding a series of four fall native plant identification workshops, starting with the first, general plant ID starting tomorrow, Tuesday the 15th, in the metropolis of Pitkin, Louisiana. These are intensive two day and a half day workshops intended as brain expanding exercises in natives. I will be taking the Asteracea / Fabacea class on October 30- Sept 1st. Cannot wait!!!!

Dr. Allen, who has literally written the books on natives. see the link

http://www.lnps.org/index_files/TripsandEvents.htm

Aslo worthy of a field trip is the Horticultural Field Day held on October 7th at the LSU Hammond Research Garden. Dr. Yan Chen and Dr. Allen Owings and others will be leading tours of their trial gardens once again. If you haven’t seen these gardens, and you make time to attend, I think you will agree that there is a lot to see and much to learn from a trip there, even if you can’t make it there that day. The gardens are open most every working day of the year. Bring your questions about you plants and gardens and meet these knowledgable folks.

Dr. Yan will be highlighting her work with native plants using local-sourced seed, which is really substantial and cutting-edge stuff! Go Tigers!

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local seed; its a natural

Collected lots of great seed from the farm yesterday. Dreamed of doing this when I was just a wannabee, back in the day. I planted giant gardens of Narrow-leafed Mountain Mint, Rough Coneflower, Spearmint scented White Mountain Mint (Malcolm Mint), Ashy Sunflower, Tall Tickseed, and copious amounts of Lindhiemer’s and Wild Bergamot Bee Balm all those years ago at the seed farm in Mississippi. It is such a treasure-pleasure to mechanically harvest from those seed fields. I hope in time that more folks do this sort of thing. That was the goal for me, not only to make a living from locally sourced native seed  produce on seed fields on my own land but also to provide a model for others to copy before I go to the big aster garden in the sky. It has worked so far. whoop-whoop!

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above, a bundle of White Leafed Mountain Mint, one that I named “Malcolm Mint” about 15 years ago, since Dr. Malcolm F. Vidrine, who I named it for, was the one to find it in the wild, propagate it, conserve it and pass it on. When I drive through my fields, and crush the Malcolm Mint plants with my tractor tires, the world fills with the heavenly sweet-scented aroma of Spearmint, a sensory delight, I must say.

 

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Similar in sensory over-load is the field of Frey Prairie genes that I planted back in 2000. Loaded with Sweet Goldenrod, one of our most useful and wonderfully scented herbs, Sweet Goldenrod, sometimes called Licorice Goldenrod is so amazing in that it transports your up onto a super-sweet scented cloud high above, when you step your feet across the field. Oh, high horticulture, how I love you! Frey Prairie is now fully extirpated; gone,  plowed under into a rice field. But my seed field has its genes, and all the texture, color, scent and diversity of what Frey once was. Its a gene-pool bank of sorts. in order to plant this field, I harvested the seed from Frey, the once, most-hallowed piece of ground. above, the golden yellow pyramidal heads of Sweet Goldenrod and the purply-pink square heads of Rough Button Blazing Star are complimentary, no doubt. Meadowmakers Seed Farm, Carriere, Pearl River County, Mississippi.

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Cool bean growing in the yard in Covington. It came in on its own only because I don’t mow much. This’n growing up the Agarista popufolia. A nice vine that the hummers and butterflies and I enjoy.

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Chuck Allen says this is a Strophostyles, above

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sweet video of me cleaning Geen Milkweed (below) that I roadside-rustled with Gail Barton last week. Sent my share off to entemologist Dr. Jovonn Hill at Mississippi State for a Balck Belt prairie pollinator planting project he’s doing. photos above are top left, clockwise, Green Milkweed in fruit, then in full seed, cleaned seed, and a massive plant that Gail and I were so impressed with. It was probably oder than she and I put together. It was a giant specimen with a bunch of seed, wrapped nicely on the highly flammable hair-like material that catches the wind and flies the seed off into the air. seed cleaning video uploaded onto my youtube channel.

KIDS! Try this at home!

Cardinal Rule

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speaking of locally native seed. a photo above of Cardinal Flower that occurred on its own in the yard this year, a great surprise, especially since I had bought in a few plants from a nurseryman, knowing they’d been shipped from a grower out of our region. Those bought plants were chewed incessantly by rabbits, so much that they are still nubbed to the ground all summer and still are. These plants, above, I found as seedlings while I was mowing one day this spring and kept the mower blades away from them. The rabbits don’t seem to want to try these. Yet. Maybe I’ll get some seed from them….

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Keep Covington Beautiful, KCB,is a group I have been working with for some time. They get stuff done, folks!

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KCB’s controlled burn result of the Blue Swamp Creek Nature Trail park is quite obvious. In the distance, see toasty Loblolly Pines, Tallow Trees and mixed vegetation. The fire opened up the landscape magically, removing several years of fuel that had built up, hiding the herb plants from the sun. In the foreground is the future Pitcher Plant flatwoods restoration area. The park is modeled after the North Carlolina Botanical Garden in Chapel Hill and the University of Wisconsin, Madison, the first Arboretum in the country that established a naturally designed and managed arboretum.

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above, sunlight and herbs are partners for biodiversity, on the ground at Blue Swamp Creek.

Permaculture in the Front Yard

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above, in the front yard of the Covington, Loosiana hacienda, my first logs of Shiitake mushrooms are ready for the skillet. I cut Gums out of my seed farm fields in January and plugged them with shitake spore-plugs. In a frying pan with butter and garlic, they are Yum-Yum!

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Granny says, “Vittles, Jethro!!”

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um, Probly not.

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last but not least, a vase of Candy Rain Lilly, Salvia and Sweet Coneflower for my sweetie, Sweetheart and wife, Candi, for the kitchen bar-counter. The amazing Sweet Coneflower, typically a plant found in wetter sites, was subjected two months of no rain, severe drought! and didn’t miss a beat when it came time to flower. That’s a drought with searing tempts that mostly reached 95 degrees every day, with at least one day at 104 degrees with a heat index of 120, yet it was happy as a clam in the ocean. Natives rock.

 

 

 

 

up to our arses in grarsses/ Dr. Mac Alford, Crosby Arboretum Botany walk

While working on another notch in the black belt last week, I attended the way-cool Grasses, Sedges and Rushes class hosted by none other than the Master of grasses himself, Charles M. Allen, Phd. Kind of like Woodstock without the music; three days of peace and love of non-flowering grass-like plants.

After following in Dr. Allen’s footsteps for for many years, I have learned that most-always, when he plans an event, it is usually a dry day and last week was no exception. I don’t know how he does that but must have something to do with communicating on the level of the grass Gods.

There was a total of eight students present, most all, wildlife biologists with the State of Loosiana and Rick Webb, of Looisiana Growers nursery, and myself.

Of course, Dr. Allen knows all the good spots to find cool plants and so he did. In Kisatchie National Forest, our classroom for the three day event, we found lots to see.

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above, click on photo to enlarge, …after we crossed through the Baygall (Pine Hammock), we stepped onto the Holy ground of a sweet Toothache grass meadow, in full flower. An interesting thing about Toothache grass is that it will only sparsely produce inflorescence (flowers) when fire has been used the previous season. A true pyrogenic plant, it needs a burn to actually trigger flowering, and hence, seed. No fire = very few flowers and seed.

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see the youtube video link I shot of the dancing swaying Toothache grass at Byrd’s Creek.

http://youtu.be/Sobt2w1g9yY

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White Topped sedge, Star grass, Dichromena odorata among the diversity of the hillside bog plant community. Not too shabby.

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Long Leaf pine seedling recruitment via natural fire

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Skeleton grass, Gymnopogon species, above

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the wide strapped leaves and fruiting parts of Carex virens at the edge of Fullerton Lake, north of Pitkin, La., Kisatchie. It is helpful, to really be able to appreciate sedges, to look at the flowering parts with a 20X magnification hand lens. It will amaze you, how much there is to these plants when you look at them with magnified eyes.

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Between classes, I was humping it in the Forest, collecting some of the sedges we were working with. This one, Carex intumescens, Bladder Sedge, has nice-sized fruiting heads.

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Biologist Chad Gaspard, of Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries, made a birthday during class. Rick Webb lights up the candles in a Blueberry pie that Top Chef Sue Allen made.

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last week’s photo of our conservation area planting for City of Mandeville/La. DOT, done last November at 190 and Causeway approach, Mandeville, La. IMG_4363

Blue Bachelor Buttons, Lavender-rosey-colored Monarda citriodora, and Coreopsis tinctoria in color with Clasping Coneflower just starting up. These annual plants will die off soon and the growth of perennial grasses and native flowering herbs will begin.

ARBORETUM SPRING BOTANY WALK (Adults)
Saturday, May 30th 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Explore the Arboretum’s native plant exhibits with Dr. Mac Alford, Herbarium Curator and Associate Professor at the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg. After a short indoor discussion of plant taxonomy and ecology, the program will move outside for a field walk through the grounds. Free for members, $5 non-members. Register by May 29.

for more info, call or check the website       http://crosbyarboretum.msstate.edu

 

Gotta go! got work to do….

That’s all, folks!

 

 

wheels on new Louisiana Children’s Museum design, rolling

Several, okay many, wonderful things happened this week in the life of Pastorek Habitats, the business. But best part of the week, as always, is like yesterday, when all the work was done and I made an early-morning break for the Mississippi state line; Pearl River County, that is, for some George W. Bush-like rest and relaxation (only in a Murica!).

Down on the farm its always like heaven on Earth for me. I got a chance to do some spraying in what is to be a new experimental planting area, getting ready for planting next year. Got to walk the prairie gardens. Lots of butterflies, everywhere. Go Micro-Prairies!!

One of the most exciting things to happen this week work-wise was my phone meeting with Architects Debra Guenther and Christian Runge with the firm Mithun. Mithun was chosen for the design of the new Louisiana Children’s Museum which will be located on eight acres in City Park, New Orleans, near the Museum of Art and the Botanical Gardens. Mithun has offices in San Fransisco and Seattle and they’ve been working with the Children’s Museum on the development of the idea of a new facility for several years.

Mithun is an interdisciplinary firm of architects, landscape architects and interior designers, providing integrated design of all those services on the project. Biohabitats’ roll is that of water resource ecologists for the project and Pastorek Habitats as the native plants and soils ecology. Its a real honor to be included in this short list of team members.  🙂

The design process is in full swing and should be finished, with working specifications completed within the next ten months or so.

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above, a few of my favorite things; a cool Prairie Parsley stand, down at the farm in Mississippi. Lots of different insects using it- fun to watch.

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click on the photo to enlarge. in the foreground, is the spring fluff of the extra-fine mass of inflorescences of Winter Bent grass, Agrostis hyemalis, a very common and abundant disturbance-oriented perennial winter-grass that is finishing up now in the natural landscape. Behind it is Sweet Coneflower, Rudbeckia subtometosa, the dark green in the center background, with course-textured Velvet Panicum, Panicum scoparium on the left and the bluish leaves of Switch grass, Panicum virgatum on the right. This is in the garden, at the house in Covington, Louisiana.

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Before I knew what Winter Bentgrass was, I called it Mississippi Tumbleweed because I lived my early adult years, 26 years, in Pearl River County, Mississippi and I always saw it collect on the fence rows in cow fields. The stem of the inflorescence, breaks, becomes detached, and floats away-rolls away in bundles, in the wind, often collecting in large windrows at the field edge. Its a beautiful thing, Winter Bent grass is. Its motional. It moves in the landscape and then around the landscape.

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cool pic of the flower of Mottled Tuberose, Manfreda variegata (foreground), with my son Cale’s “tornado pot” and my ceramic sculpture “Family”, on yellow pedestal. The Tuberose is such a great garden plant, a native of Texas-northern Mexico. I got my start many years ago from Texas nurseryman and radical garden designer Will Fleming. The flowers are all stamen and really unusual but its all about the foliage of Mottled Tuberose. Its like a giant Manfreda virginica, but with dark green leaves that are strap-like and often, 12 to 18 inches long. The rosette of leaves grows low and flat to the ground, no more than a few inches tall; perfectly prostrate, covering a circle of ground and eventually making pups that pop-up from the root. Coolest plant ever? Maybe. Best plant ever? Probably.

Mr. Fleming selects for the really mottle leaf forms since the seedlings vary greatly from heavily mottled to nearly mottless. He likes to put those showy ones in his gardens.

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Here’s a garden with Mottled Manfreda that I planted five years ago in the native garden area at City Park Botanical Garden, New Orleans. It was budding-up a couple of weeks ago when I visited. Mexican Primrose, the pink carpet surrounding it, in spring full-glory.

a very revealing story in this paper written by my friend and mentor, Dr. Malcolm F. Vidrine, at below link

http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1076&context=napcproceedings

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above, for more on the story of our need to protect the health of our watersheds, streams and rivers, is this book by Dr. Vidrine

Also, a notice for the Tall Grass Prairie Center’s -2015 Iowa Prairie Conference: Working Prairies in July via Dr. Bruno “Tee-Bru” Borsari, in Winona, U of Minnnesota – see link

http://www.tallgrassprairiecenter.org/2015-prairie-conference

HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY TO ALL THE MOTHERS ON THIS, MOTHER’S DAY, AND ESPECIALLY TO MY BEAUTIFUL MUM, JANE PASTOREK! (…and to Candi, my wife)

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Sunday garden stroll in LSU’s Hammond Camellia forest -awesome

If you haven’t been to the LSU Hammond Research Station to see the Camellia collection in its full-blooming glory, you are sadly missing out on one of the best kept horticultural experiences in the state. You don’t have to be a plant lover to thoroughly enjoy this wonderful garden. See the fascinating article by Stephanie Bruno on the collection at the link (oh, and photos from yesterday) below.

http://www.theneworleansadvocate.com/features/homegarden/11635433-171/lsu-agcenter-hosts-camellia-stroll

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my friend Charles Allen with Loblolly pine and old timey camellias.

click to enlarge of the photographs to check out the landscape of towering Loblolly pines and a zillion colors and shapes and sizes a la Camellia. Its a magical feeling walking through this garden. Charles Allen and family, etc met Candi and I there for a stroll through.

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stately pines with an understory of hundreds of old flowery Camellia shrubs

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I don’t know a single Camellia name was told this one is Rebel Yell, nice name. 🙂

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and this one’s Carter’s Sunburst

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After the Camellia walk we took a side trip just a couple of miles away to Chapapeela Sports Park, off of Airport Road in Hammond. The gardens at the park are really robust and I consider them to be top notch and super diverse; very beautiful. The Little Bluestem there is thick (or “tick”, as they say down the bayou). These are the same gardens that provide a cool natural habitat that Dr. Bill Platt and his students with his Conservation Biology class use as an outdoor lab. It was the first time that I had had the pleasure of showing the gardens off to Dr Allen, who is a major mentor of mine and the person who, along with Dr. Vidrine and others, is the inspiration for my prairie landscape business. It was a great treat to show it off to him and to the others in attendance. whoop-whoop!! Go Micro-Prairies!!!

thanks to nasa and awesome technology, here are two google earth maps with locations of the Camellia garden and the prairie grass gardens. they’re self explanatory. You can go to these public spaces during daylight hours to visit. Go often.

Chapapeela and Hammond station map

hammond

 

EXTRA!    —–news flash!!  

KIDNEY BEAN SHAPED NATIVE GRASS BEDS AT A GROOVY ST TAMMANY RESIDENCE GET PLANTED    Yayah!!!

prairie grass gardens

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Awesome Native Grass gardens went in this weekend in Folsom, Louisiana at the guest house of a client. The client spread the garden areas out with herbicide during the summer a few times to reduce the likelyhood of perennial grass competition. I like this grass island concept but I would scratch the tree design I originally presented a year or so ago and do a Long Leaf pine meadow as a forty foot strip at the road edge to connect the south end of the property with the meadow on the north end of the property. The purpose is to build a baffle between the road and the house as natural baffle; a separation from the road creating a more intimate garden room. This would also allow for a much easier, less rigid management program for the the area, a softer touch.

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Dallas Blue Switch grass. Its a pretty thing….

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Tripsicum floridanum in foreground of this bed, with Muhlenbergia lindhiemeri in the rear. An island of Tripsicum dactyloides and Muhlenbergia capillaris to the left island and Dallas Blue Switch on the right. Lindhiemers Muhly is one of the top three grass plants for effect in Louisiana gardens, at least ornamentally speaking. A bad-ass grass.

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in a largest island garden, next to my truck, is a non-cultvar native Switch grass that fills the bed, with 5 Aralia spinosa, Devil’s Walking Stick, gracing a central area. Aralia spinosa’s a cool looking plant with pulpy berries that birds love and a flower head as big as a basketball. cool.

 

 

 

 

PH species list for SW Louisiana-Gulf-Coastal-wet-prairie-seed collection, 2014

Special thanks to biologists Dr. Charles M. Allen, Dr. Malcolm F. Vidrine, Dr. Charles Bryson, Chris Reid, Larry Allain, Dr. Charles Bryson, Gail Barton, and Dr. Billy Delany for their valuable assistance with guiding work to develop this list!

Louisiana Coastal Tall Grass Wet Prairie Species collection-list 2015                              Pastorek Habitats, LLC, Covington, Louisiana

grasses and grass-like species

Andropogon gerardii

Andropogon glommeratus

Andropogon gyrans

Andropogon ternarius

Andropogon scoparium

Andropogon virginicus

Anthaenantia rufa

Aristida purpurascens

Aristida dichotoma

Aristida longespica

Bothriochloa longipaniculata

Carex glaucescens

Carex vulpinoidea

Cladium jamaicense

Coelorachis cylindrica

Coelorachis rugosa

Ctenium aromaticum

Cyperus acuminatus

Cyperus erythrorhizos

Cyperus haspan

Cyperus psuedovegetus

Cyperus oxylepis

Cyperus virens

Dicanthelium aciculare

Dicanthelium commutatum

Dicanthelium dichotomum

Dicanthelium scoparium

Dicanthelium scabrusculum

Dichromena colorata

Digitaria filiformis var. villosa

Eliocharis montevidensis

Eliocharis quadrangularis

Eragrostis elliotii

Eragrostis refracta

Eragrostis spectabilis

Erianthus gigantea

Erianthus strictus

Eriocolon decangulare

Fuirena squarrosa

Juncus dichotomus

Juncus tenuis

Juncus marginatus

Leersia orysoides

Muhlenbergia capillaris

Muhlenbergia capillaris var expansa

Panicum anceps

Panicum dichotomiflorum

Panicum dichotomum

Panicum virgatum

Paspalum floridanum

Paspalum laeve

Paspalum praecox

Paspalum plicatulum

Rhynchospora corniculata

Rhynchospora inexpansa

Rhyncospora glaberata

Rhyncospora globularis

Scirpus cyperinus

Schizachyrium scoparium

Schizachyrium tenerum

Scleria pauciflora

Scleria reticularis

Sorgastrum nutans

Sporobolus junceus

Steinchisma hians

Tridens ambiguus

Tridens flavus

Tridens strictus

Tripsicum dactyloides

forbs and composites

Agalinus fasciculata

agalinus purpurea

Agalinus viridis

Aletris aurea

Amsonia tabernaemontana

Arnoglossum ovata

Asclepias lanceolata

Asclepias obovata

Asclepias viridiflora

Baptisia alba

Baptisia bracteata

Baptisia spherocarpa

Baptisia nuttalliana

Bigelowia nudata

Boltonia difusa

Boltonia asteroides

Biden aristosa

Bidens mitis

Buchnera americana

Cicuta maculata

Chamaecrista fasciculata

Coreopsis tinctoria

Coreopsis lanceolata

Coreopsis linifolia

Coreopsis tripteris

Coreopsis pubescens

Chrysopsis mariana

Croton monanthogynus

Croton capitatus

Dalea candida

Desmodium paniculatum

Echinacea pallida

Erigeron strigusus

Eryngium yuccafolium

Eryngium integrifolium

Erythrina herbacea

Eupatorium album

Eupatorium coelestinum

Eupatorium hyssopifolium

Eupatorium ivifolium

Eupatorium perfoliatum

Eupatorium rotundifolium

Eupatorium xpinnatifidum

Euphorbia corollata

Eurybia hemispherica

Euthamia leptocephala

Euthamia tenuifolia

Gailardia aestivalis

Gailardia aestivalis var flarovirens

Gnaphalium obtusifolium

Guara lindhiemeri

Guara longiflora

Helianthus angustifolius

Helianthus mollis

Heterotheca subaxillaris

Hibiscus mosheutos

Hibiscus grandiflorus

Hypericum nudiflorum

Hydrolea ovata

Hydrolea unifora

Hyptis alata

Kosteletzkya virginica

Lespedeza capitata

Lespedeza virginica

Liatris acidota

Liatris elegans

Liatris spicata

Liatris pycnostachya

Liatris squarrosa

Lobelia appendiculata

Lobelia floridana

Lobelia puberula

Manfreda virginica

Monarda fistulosa

Monarda lindhiemeri

Monarda punctata

Oxypolis filiformis

Passiflora incarnata

Penstemon digitalis

Pluchea comphorata

Pluchea foetida

Polytaenia nuttallii

Pycnanthemum albescens

Pycnanthemum muticum

Pycnanthemum tenuifolium

Rhexia mariana

Rhexia lutea

Rhexia virginica

Ruellia humilis

Rudbeckia hirta

Rudbeckia grandiflora

Rudbeckia texana

Sabatia campestris

Sabatia gentianoides

Sabatia macrophylla

Salvia azurea

Scutellaria integrifolia

Shrankia quadrivalis

Silphium asteriscus

Silphium gracile

Silphium Laciniata

Solidago nitida

Solidago odora

Solidago rugosa

Solidago sempervirens

Strophostyles umbellata

Symphyotrichum dumosum

Symphyotrichum concolor

Symphyotrichum lateriflorus

Symphyotrichum patens

Symphyotrichum praealtus

Tephrosia onobrychoides

Teucrium canadense

Vernonia gigantea

Vernonia missourica

Vernonia texana

West Monroe’s Mayor backs Dr. Joydeep’s scientific wildflower design and controlled burn management for Kiroli park. Go Micro-Prairies!!!

I had a long awaited meeting with West Monroe, Louisiana’s Mayor Dave Norris, Parks Director Doug Seegers, and Dr. Joydeep Bhattacharjee yesterday. It was a year and a half in the works. The question was, will the Mayor sign-off on a scientifically designed wildflower garden devised by Dr. Joydeep, installed and managed by yours truly, for Kiroli Park, the crown jewel of the West Monroe Park system.

The answer from his honor, the Mayor, was a resounding YES!!!!

Whootie-hoot!!

Mayor Dave Norris has been mayor of West Monroe for over thirty five years. He seemed a very personable, kind and wise man.

Dr. Bhattacharjee is a plant and restoration Ecologist at the University of Louisiana, Monroe. He and I have been discussing the design concept for project and finally got the chance to present it to the Mayor. The design is “aimed at evaluating recolonization potential of prairie species in open fields”.  Nice!  🙂

These experiments will be subtly built into a colorful, flowery Bluestem grass garden where he and his students will set up study plots within the planting to collect information on the planting’s establishment and development over time. They’ll do what scientists do, collect and analyze data.

Meanwhile, the estimated 140,000 people who visit the Park each year will be the beneficiaries of a cool rare-plant native wildflower garden.

I consider Joydeep’s garden design to be high art. I wish I could show it here but he wants to hone it more before divulging it to the world. That’ll come later. I’ll let him do the honor when the time comes.

drbprofile

above: Dr, Joydeep Bhattacharjee, Associate Professor Plant and Restoration Ecology, University of Louisiana, Monroe.

Kiroli Park is sixty acres loaded with wonderfully old second-growth upland Pine and bottomland Cypress-Gum forest habitat remnants that have been sadly separated for many years from their cousins, the native flowering herbs and grasses. This news should put smiles on those old trees’ faces. This thought harkens me back to the old Peaches and Herb singing duo’s song lyrics, “reunited and it feels so good!”

What is particularly special about our meeting yesterday is that we also got permission to manage the flower garden with controlled burns. The fire will encourage natural succession to occur progressively over time, revealing the most delicate and beautiful flowering plants within the seed collection.

Without fire, a prairie is just a faux meadow.

With fire, its a biodiversity garden: a micro-prairie.

Go! Dr. Joydeep!!!

Go! Micro-Prairies!!!!