clematis, prized prairie companions

Species of Clematis native to Louisiana and the surrounding region are good general use garden plants and they lend themselves exceptionally well to the natural prairie landscape. Clematis grows to less than eight feet or so, perfect for going upwardly on a  small garden trellis or horizontally, across the top of prairie grasses. These plants are herbaceous with thin brittle woody stems but the plants are very long lived and tough as nails (specifically the Clematis species crispa, pitcheri, reticulata and glaucophylla).

Get some!

They divide via root and grow via seed, collect seed green and sow immediately. Once established, they’ll live longer than you!

IMG_0305

C. reticulata on my tractor shed, seed from Highway 43 north of Henleyfield Mississippi, above, below

IMG_0303

 

below, Clematis pitcheri, originally via Lynn Lowery, Houston, Texas, April 1994, in my Covington, Louisiana meadow garden

Lynn Lowery article http://southerngardenhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Magnolia_Summer_1999.pdf

Clematis crispa, below, in my garden, originally via seed from the edge of the Pearl River, near Nicholson, Mississippi approximately 1991.

IMG_0236

Jeff McMillian of Almost Eden nursery lists Crispa in his family’s plant inventory.

 

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

______________________________________________________________________________________

 

New Orleans Museum of Art Sculpture Garden addition design and construction is complete!

The opening ceremony to celebrate doubling the size of the garden was Tuesday. Working with Reed-Hilderbrand Landscape Architects for the last three years as their local horticultural consultant was quite the enjoyable experience.  go Team!

 

IMG_0416

Ground covering Sedges reign mightily over the sculptures at the Museum Gardens.

 

IMG_0423

 

 

IMG_0433

The Elyn Zimmerman glass bridge sculpture carries foot traffic.

 

—————————————————————————————————————

 

                  Meadow garden open to the public in June

IMG_0250

a view of Doug and mary Green’s prairie garden last week, Folsom, Louisiana.

IMG_0244

above, Lespedeza capitata, left and below, Penstemon digitalis

IMG_0287

Restored Native Wildflower Habitat Field Trip, Folsom, La

The Louisiana Native Plant Society will meet June 15 in Folsom Louisiana at 10 a.m. at the home of Doug and Mary Green to experience their 3 acre prairie garden. The garden, planted from seed five years ago by Doug, has a developed into a particularly impressive array of flowering plants, some in large populations. Management of the garden has been done only by burning and mowing. This garden will be featured in the soon-published revised edition of Sally Wasowsky’s Gardening with Native Plants of the South. We will meet at the corner of Henri and Bienville Streets where the garden is right there at your feet. Address is 320 Bienville Rd, Folsom, La. The reason for the 11:00 timing is the hope to see butterflies and other insects.
For more information contact Marc Pastorek
meadowmakers@gmail.com

 

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

 

Bullet-proof garden plants lecture

I will be discussing superior native plants adaptable to the Central Gulf coastal region, but specifically the New Orleans garden – I’ll cover a long list of nearly care-free herbs, grasses, grass-likes, vines, shrubs and trees – at the New Orleans City Park Botanical Gardens Saturday, June 1, 10:30-11:30. I hope to see you there!

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

 

Steven F. Austin University visit was so fun!

 

Dr. Allen and I were treated like we were Elvis Presley (thank you ver’ much!) by Dr. David Creech and his gardening associates at The Pineywoods Garden at SFA last week. Got a tour of the gardens which is always exciting. They are very active in horticulture there and have been for a long while. Talked all things prairie including treating them to the story of the Winkler’s Firewheel that has been growing in my prairie demo gardens in Mississippi for the last 20 years, was originally from SFA. I brought them a bunch of my seed crop from last year in return for their original start, via Botanist-nurseryman Peter Loos, former student of Dr. Creech.

IMG_0348

Garden pavillion built by Dr Creech and students back some years ago, and Lady Bird Johnson letter on the wall of David’s office building.

IMG_0349

 

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

Clematis Botany 101

by Dr. Charles Allen

The genus Clematis (leather flower, virginsbower) includes mostly native herbaceous to slightly woody perennial vine species in the Ranunculaceae (Dicot). The leaves are opposite and pinnately compound. The inflorescences are axillary and a solitary flower or cyme. The flowers are perfect and regular with four petaloid sepals, no petals, and numerous stamens. The ovary is superior and numerous brown flat achenes develop from the carpels. There are two major groups of species; one group including C. crispa, C. glaucophylla, and C. reticulata produce a single flower while the others including C. catesbyana, C. terniflora, and C. virginiana produce many flowers in a cyme. Five of the species are native with only C. ternifolia introduced from Japan. Note: there are a number of cultivated species and forms of Clematis with one species Clematis x jackmanii perhaps escaping and is reported from nine parishes across the state. Note: info and images from Allen, Wilson and Winters ‘Louisiana Wildflower Guide” and info also from Allen, Newman, and Winters “Trees, Shrubs, and Woody Vines of Louisiana”. Other images from the intenet.

A. A.

Flowers white, numerous in a somewhat flat cyme; filaments glabrous………………B Flowers pink to blue or purple, solitary; filaments pubescent……………………………….D

B(A). Flowers perfect, with 5-10 carpels; anthers 1.5-3 mm long; leaf margins entire (rarely Somewhat lobed……………………………………………………………………………..5. C. terniflora
B. Flowers mostly imperfect, with more than 15 carpels; anthers 1 mm or shorter; leaf

margins coarsely toothed………………………………………………………………………………………C

C(B.) Leaflets 5-7; carpels 18-35 ………………………………………………………………….1. C. catesbyana C.Leaflets three; carpels 40 or more ………………………………………………………….. 6. C. virginiana

D(A). Flowers without bracts………………………………………………………………….2. C. crispa D. Flowers with two bracts present…………………………………………………………………..E

E(D). Leaves leathery; veins distinctly reticulate veined……………………………………..4. C. reticulata
E. Leaves membranous; veins not reticulate veined…………………………………………..3. C. glaucophylla

1. Clematis catesbyana Pursh (Coastal Virgin’s-bower, Satin-curls) syn = C. ligusticifolia Nutt. Ex T and G. Similar to C. virginiana but with 5-7 leaflets, 18-35 carpels, and darker achenes that are reddish brown to dark purplish black. Reported only from St. Helena and West Feliciana parishes but additional records may be out there and filed away under C. virginiana. Someone should examine all the Clematis specimens in the state. Wetland ranking FAC

2. Clematis crispa L. (Swamp leatherflower, Marsh Clematis, Southern Leatherflower, Blue Jasmine) The leaves have 3-5 linear to ovate leaflets that are cuneate to truncate at the base and acute to obtuse apically. The margins are entire and revolute, sometimes lobed. It produces single pink, lavender, or blue (rarely white) flowers without a bract. The filaments are pubescent. A common species of the Mississippi River floodplain and other hardwood forest areas throughout the state. It

has a long flowering time from March to October. Reported from 59 parishes and missing from

Beauregard, Bienville, Evangeline, Plaquemines, and St. Charles parishes. Wetland ranking FACW

  1. Clematis glaucophylla Small (whiteleaf leatherflower, glaucous leatherflower) The leaves have 2-5 ovate, entire leaflets that are usually cordate at the base. The lower surface is grayish white whenyoung, hence the name glaucophylla, but becoming green with age. The flowers are solitary and rose purple on the outside and white inside. Two bracts subtend each flower. Filaments pubescent. Rare in Louisiana with the only report from Copenhagen Prairie in Caldwell Parish. Wetland ranking FAC
  2. Clematis reticulata (netleaf leatherflower, netleaf clematis) The leaves have 3-9 ovate to elliptic, leathery, leaflets that are usually cuneate at the base and obtuse apically. The veins are distinctly reticulate and the margins are revolute, frequently lobed. The flowers are solitary and bluish with two bracts. Filaments pubescent. Infrequent in west and northwest Louisiana on well drained, often sandy soils with reports from eight parishes in west and northwest Louisiana; Bienville, Bossier, Caddo, De Soto, Natchitoches, Rapides, Sabine, and Vernon. No wetland ranking.
  3. Clematis terniflora DC (Japanese virginsbower, sweet autumn virginsbower) Synonyms include Clematis dioscoreifolia, Clematis maximowicziana, and Clematis paniculata. This is a non-native introduced from Japan and Korea. The leaves have 3-5 ovate to elliptic leaflets that are entire to lobed. The base of the leaflets is subcordate or rounded and the apex acuminate to acute. The flowers are white, perfect, and in large clusters. The anthers are 1.5-3 mm long with glabrous filaments. The achenes are brown and obovoid. It is reported from 35 parishes; Acadia, Allen, Avoyelles, Bienville, Bossier, Caddo, Calcasieu, Caldwell, Cameron, Claiborne, De Soto, East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, Franklin, Lincoln, Livingston, Morehouse, Natchitoches, Orleans, Ouachita, St. Charles, St. Helena, St. Landry, St. Mary, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa, Tensas, Union, Vermilion, Vernon, Washington, West Baton Rouge, West Carroll, West Feliciana, and Winn. Wetland ranking = FACU.
  4. Clematis virginiana L. (virginsbower, devil’s darning needles, herbe, gueux) The leaves have three, rarely five, ovate leaflets that are serrate to lobed, rarely entire. The base of the leaflets is truncate to cordate and both surfaces are light green. The flowers are white and in large clusters. The anthers are 1 mm or shorter and filaments glabrous. The achenes are light to dark brown or greenish brown. Various medicinal uses are reported including a liniment once used for skin eruptions and itching and a leaf tea used for insomnia, nervous headaches and uterine disease. There are also warnings that the plant can be toxic and highly irritating to the skin and ingestion may cause vomiting, diarrhea, and convulsions. Widespread across the state and reported from 51 parishes; Ascension, Assumption, Avoyelles, Bienville, Bossier, Caddo, Caldwell, Catahoula, Claiborne, De Soto, East Baton Rouge, East Carroll, East Feliciana, Evangeline, Franklin, Grant, Iberia, Jackson, Jefferson, Lafayette, Lafourche, LaSalle, Lincoln, Livingston, Madison, Morehouse, Natchitoches, Orleans, Ouachita, Plaquemines, Pointe Coupee, Rapides, Red River, Richland, Sabine, St. Charles, St. Helena, St. James, St. John the Baptist, St. Landry, St. Mary, St. Tammany, Terrebonne, Union, Vermilion, Vernon, Washington, Webster, West Carroll, West Feliciana, and Winn. Wetland ranking = FAC.

 

1 thought on “clematis, prized prairie companions

  1. Marc I’m so sorry I’m going to miss your talk in New Orleans. Me, Tammany, Nell Howard and Joan Doyle are traveling to the Birmingham Native Plant Conference. If you have a handout can I get one?

    Where oh where can I get one of those red clematis? I’ve been wanting to get one since I saw it growing on a fence at Ladybird Wildflower Center before Katrina.

    Tell your wife to NOT pass up her mammogram appointments. One year is actually too long if shed on post menopausal hormones. They caught a stage 1 the size of a pea! Thank God I don’t have to take chemo. I had a lumpectomy on my birthday April 1 and am now going through 30 radiation treatments. I will then have to take an anti estrogen pill for 5 years My estrogen is 99/100. No wonder I had almost no menopausal symptoms. .

    On Mon, May 20, 2019, 10:15 AM Meadows. Seed. Art. wrote:

    > marcgpastorek posted: “Species of Clematis native to Louisiana and the > surrounding region are good general use garden plants and they lend > themselves exceptionally well to the natural prairie landscape. Clematis > grow to less than eight feet or so, perfect for going upwardly on ” >

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s