Botanical workmanship examined, experienced, in prairie restoration field day

Cajun Prairie Restoration Field day to be held, September 8, 2018

Butterfly candy, Liatris pycnostachya, Kansas Blazingstar, in flower, at Duralde, August 29, 2018.

wirey foliage and inflorescence of Slender Bluestem carpets the ground at the Lacasinne National Wildlife Refuge’s Duralde, Louisiana prairie Restoration. est. 1996

unique foliage of Compass Plant, a rare Louisiana composite species

Compass Plant with its staggered flowering expression

Bumble Bees, excited to be alive and on Compass Plant flowers

a blue foliaged, robust clump of Indian Grass stands out amongst the green tapestry in the Duralde Restoration Project site (center, above)

September 8, 2018 is the date set for the annual summer prairie extravaganza, in Eunice Louisiana, the home site for the Cajun Prairie Habitat Preservation Society. Prairie enthusiasts and activists, along with anyone interested in knowing more about native wildflowers and their important associates, grasses, can and should come to Eunice that day to learn about the wonder of grassland dynamics and the inherent beauty of the plants associated with this biome. The field event occurs in the morning, followed by a lunch and lecture, at Rocky’s Cajun Restaurant in Eunice.

Be there, or be square!

For more information go to http://www.cajunprairie.org

new book, just available, on volunteerism in the Cajun Prairie Society by Society Co-founder, Malcolm F. Vidrine. You can preview the entire book at this site link, below.

http://www.blurb.com/b/8916677-the-cajun-prairie-restoration-project-in-eunice-lo

have a great day, and hope to see you all next Saturday!

Marc G. Pastorek

2 thoughts on “Botanical workmanship examined, experienced, in prairie restoration field day

  1. I happened to be in the Kansas City area on Memorial Day, and visited a restored prairie there. I saw some large, fancy leaves that I’d never come across. Now, thanks to your photos, I’m sure they were compass plant. It’s apparently common enough in Kansas, but not so much here in SE Texas.

    I always appreciate the posts here, and always learn something.

    • Thank you, shoreacres. Its always great to recieve comments, good or bad. It makes the effort I do producing this all worth it. Go microprairies! Go nanoprairies!!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s