Crosby and Kisatchie Bog-Baygall trips, May 16th/Lipkin Hill Botanical Area-Old River WMA trip a near-complete success!!

Dr. Wayne Morris will lead a group of wild plant enthusiasts on a field trip to the Crosby Hillside bog and to the Steep Hollow natural area. As far as I know, this is the first trip Crosby has offered the trip to the Steep Hollow site, a place I have wanted to see for many years. Should be a great day, with many folks filling the pews. Be a part of this fun and informative field day. Turn off the computer and TV and get some nature in, ya’ll.

25th Annual Bog and Baygalls Field Trips with Dr. Charles Allen

For 25 years, folks have been meeting for the Bogs and Baygalls event in Kisatchie National Forest. For the last 15 years, this event has been based at the home of Charles and Sue Allen, who live on a property that joins Kisatchie, with the Ouskachitto River in their backyard.

Charles has worked for many years building and managing gardens focused on butterfly attraction. Charles is one of the the leading authorities on Bogs and Baygalls and he has been involved in this fun weekend of events since its started with the help of the late Robert Murray.

I haven’t decided which of these bog events I will attend, but I’m sure they will both be well attended and will be fun-filled days.

Old River WMA Lipkin Hill Botanical Area trip was a success!

We met for the annual field trip at my prairie seed farm Saturday. It was a light crowd, smaller than usual but we were also getting predictions of 60% rain for the day. As it turned out, we finished the four hour event with perfect weather, just as the rain began to come down.

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You know you’re getting close to Lipkin Hill when you start seeing the Indian Pinks,  Spigelia marilandica,in the leaf litter, above, and Red Buckeye, Aesculus pavia.

We missed the Native Camellia, Stewartia malacodendron, in flower, by a day, or maybe a couple of days. Two years ago, when we made the trip last, we were a single day late, finding only clusters of stamens on the plants, and petals of the spent flowers on the ground. A rain had come the night before and beaten the flowers off.

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a tight bud of Native Camellia, a giant at fifteen feet tall and wide. The only blooms that occur are way up high where the branches reach for precious sunlight. A thick canopy of old growth trees covers this north facing slope of this River bluff

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above, a baby Stewartia, a foot or so tall, may be as old as twenty or forty years.

I have been going to Lipkin Hill since 1983. The Stewartias look the same as the first time I saw them. These are ancient plants. My good friend, Dorothy “Dot” Burge, who lived only 500 yards from Lipkin hill since 1945, said that they have stayed the same since she first saw the in the late 1940’s. No telling how old these plants are.

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above, an old Magnolia grandiflora with old native Vitus, muscadine vine, lovingly attached.  Rick and his wife Susan were, at one point, only thirty or so feet away and I could barely make them out, the woods are so dense there.

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above, here everything reaches upwardly. Rick Webb found the prize du jour, the Pyramid Magnolia in bloom. Here he bends the branch over for this photo of heaven right here on Earth. The flower’s about a foot across in size.

To get to Lipkin Hill, we walked a mile or so into the woods until suddenly the trail drops dramatically off the bluff, into the Pearl backwater.

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above, looking west into the beautiful Pearl River backwater, standing on the old logging rail spur bed that was cut into the slope, you see a fine second growth of buttressed Cypress-Tupelo-Water Hickory bottomland forest. In summer, when the floodwaters recede, the backwater ground plain fills becomes a mud-flat filled with White Swamp Milkweed, Asclepias perennis, and Cardinal Flower, Lobelia cardinalis.

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Looking up the trunk of one of the many fifty foot tall Cowcumber Magnolia trees, Magnolia Macrophylla, that fill this west-facing slope of Lipkin. Susan Webb pointed out giant flower petals on the ground that had fallen from the sun filled tops of the Cowcumbers.

Photos of the Week

Coreopsis nudata, found in only one Parish in Louisiana, St. Tammany, on a highway in the south part of the parish, in a pine flat.

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This Coreopsis is an obligate wetland species, not common in the landscape, especially here at the very western edge of its distribution range. click to enlarge photos.

 

 

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